Skip to main content

Malware attack cripples newspapers across United States

A malware attack disrupted the production and delivery of newspapers across the United States over the weekend, affecting the Saturday editions of the Los Angeles Times and San Diego Union Tribune, among others.

Tribune Publishing detected malware on its servers on Friday, sending technology teams scrambling to contain the attack. However, it spread through the company’s network, crippling the news production and printing process for the multiple newspapers that shared Tribune’s platform.

The Los Angeles Times and the San Diego Union Tribune, which Tribune formerly owned, experienced distribution delays for their Saturday editions. The two newspapers were sold to Los Angeles biotech entrepreneur Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong last June, but they still share several systems, including software.

The Los Angeles Times said that most of its subscribers were still able to receive their Saturday newspapers, though they were late by several hours. Meanwhile, for the San Diego Union Tribune, 85 percent to 90 percent of its Saturday edition was not delivered to subscribers on Saturday morning.

The distribution of The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal were also delayed in Southern California, as they are printed at the Los Angeles Times’ printing plant. The Baltimore Sun, meanwhile, released its Saturday edition without the usual comics and puzzles.

The malware attack did not compromise the credit card information or other personal data of customers, according to Tribune CEO Justin Dearborn.

The purpose of the malware attack remains unclear, though a source familiar with the situation revealed that it appears that the intention was to disable servers, not to steal data, the Los Angeles Times reported. The malware attack may have come from outside the United States, according to the same source, without detailing the evidence that resulted in the allegation.

The threat of malware remains constant. Last month, a study by cybersecurity researchers discovered that Russian hackers are targeting email accounts in the United States and Europe with a new kind of phishing malware. Earlier in December, a report suggested that over 415,000 routers around the world may be affected by malware to enable cryptojacking, which is a scheme where hackers steal the computing power of connected PCs to mine for cryptocurrency.

Editors' Recommendations

Aaron Mamiit
Aaron received a NES and a copy of Super Mario Bros. for Christmas when he was 4 years old, and he has been fascinated with…
This Alienware gaming PC with RTX 4070 Super is $400 cheaper today
Alienware Aurora R16 sitting on a coffee table.

If you don't know how to build a PC from scratch, then you may want to go for a pre-built gaming PC, and one of the best comes from Alienware, which is a Dell brand. Interestingly, Dell has recently gone through a refresh of most of its gear, and that includes the new and improved Aurora R16. While it doesn't look as cool as the older case, it's still as powerful, and this configuration is a great mid-range option that you can grab from Dell for just $1,500 instead of the usual $1,900.

Why you should buy the Alienware Aurora R16
Modern gaming can get pretty difficult to do, especially if you want to do 4K or really high refresh rates. While this configuration of the Alienware Aurora R16 won't hit 4k with high settings, it's still pretty excellent. You get an RTX 4070 Super, which actually can do around 60FPS at 4K with average settings, but where it really shines is in 2K gaming performance, especially if you want to hit over 100fps with high graphical settings. It also has excellent ray-tracing performance, and you even get access to the latest DLSS 3.5, although it is worth mentioning that both of these aren't available in all games, so be sure the ones you want to play support them.

Read more
3 important ways gaming on Arm PCs just got better
Gaming on a laptop with the Snapdragon X Elite chip

While the current selection of Copilot+ PCs aren't focused on gaming, Microsoft has expressed strong confidence in the potential of gaming on Arm-based PCs.

With the launch of Qualcomm’s Snapdragon X Elite platform, the tech giant highlighted several improvements and initiatives aimed at enhancing the gaming experience on the platform, particularly with the Copilot+ PCs coming soon. These advancements include optimizations through Microsoft's "Prism" technology, automatic super resolution, and enhanced anti-cheat software compatibility, all of which address some of the long-standing challenges faced by Arm-based systems in the gaming sector.

Read more
This small Windows update brings a highly requested change

Microsoft is simplifying file management in Windows 11 with a new feature in the latest Canary Build (an early preview version of Windows 11). Users can drag and drop files directly between breadcrumbs (paths) in File Explorer. This fulfills a common request from Windows Insiders, and is something Microsoft recently announced in a June 19 Windows Insider Blog post.

These breadcrumbs are the paths you take to where you want to save your file. For example, This PC > Windows (C:) > Program Files. The breadcrumbs will appear in the Address Bar and display the current path taken inside the app. This feature also seems to have reached non-Insiders since its release at the end of May.

Read more