Skip to main content

Sony CEO Stringer says sorry for PlayStation problems

sony-psn-playstation-networkA letter from Sony’s CEO Howard Stringer in which he apologized to millions of PlayStation Network and Qriocity users was posted on the PlayStation blog late Thursday.

The apology comes in the wake of the data loss of millions of users following a hack which took place between April 17 and 19. The perpetrators of the hack have not yet been identified, and the PlayStation Network and Qriocity services are still down.

The letter begins: “I know this has been a frustrating time for all of you.” Stringer reassures users that the company has been concentrating on investigating the recent cyber attack and that it is “absolutely dedicated to restoring full and safe service as soon as possible.” He adds: “We will settle for nothing less.”

In an attempt to placate customers, Stringer, who had up until now remained silent on the data loss issue, announced the launch of its identity theft protection scheme in which US users can enroll for free. Announcements for other areas will be coming soon, he wrote.

Stringer made his apology halfway through the letter: “As a company we — and I — apologize for the inconvenience and concern caused by this attack. Under the leadership of Kazuo Hirai, we have teams working around the clock and around the world to restore your access to those services as quickly, and as safely, as possible.”

Addressing criticism that the company was slow off the mark in informing customers of the problems, Stringer wrote: “I know some believe we should have notified our customers earlier than we did. It’s a fair question. As soon as we discovered the potential scope of the intrusion, we shut down the PlayStation Network and Qriocity services and hired some of the best technical experts in the field to determine what happened.”

He goes on: “I wish we could have gotten the answers we needed sooner, but forensic analysis is a complex, time-consuming process. Hackers, after all, do their best to cover their tracks, and it took some time for our experts to find those tracks and begin to identify what personal information had — or had not — been taken.”

The letter ends: “In the coming days, we will restore service to the networks and welcome you back to the fun. I wanted to personally reach out and let you know that we are committed to serving you to the very best of our ability, protecting your information better than ever, and getting you back to what you signed up for – all the games and great entertainment experiences that you expect from Sony.”

We’ll have to wait and see whether the content of the CEO’s letter is enough to restore confidence in users of Sony’s services. For some it may at least be a step in the right direction, while others will be waiting for further details about how the company will be protecting users’ data in the future.

Editors' Recommendations

Trevor Mogg
Contributing Editor
Not so many moons ago, Trevor moved from one tea-loving island nation that drives on the left (Britain) to another (Japan)…
It’s time to stop believing these PC building myths
Hyte's Thicc Q60 all-in-one liquid cooler.

As far as hobbies go, PC hardware is neither the cheapest nor the easiest one to get into. That's precisely why you may often run into various misconceptions and myths.

These myths have been circulating for so long now that many accept them as a universal truth, even though they're anything but. Below, I'll walk you through some PC beliefs that have been debunked over and over, and, yet, are still prevalent.
Liquid cooling is high-maintenance (and scary)

Read more
AMD’s next-gen CPUs are much closer than we thought
AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D held between fingertips.

We already knew that AMD would launch its Zen 5 CPUs this year, but recent motherboard updates hint that a release is imminent. Both MSI and Asus have released updates for their 600-series motherboards that explicitly add support for "next-generation AMD Ryzen processors," setting the stage for AMD's next-gen CPUs.

This saga started a few days ago when hardware leaker 9550pro spotted an MSI BIOS update, which they shared on X (formerly Twitter). Since then, Asus has followed suit with BIOS updates of its own featuring a new AMD Generic Encapsulated Software Architecture (AGESA) -- the firmware responsible for starting the CPU -- that brings support for next-gen CPUs (spotted by VideoCardz).

Read more
AMD Zen 5: Everything we know about AMD’s next-gen CPUs
The AMD Ryzen 5 8600G APU installed in a motherboard.

AMD Zen 5 is the next-generation Ryzen CPU architecture for Team Red and is slated for a launch sometime in 2024. We've been hearing tantalizing rumors for a while now and promises of big leaps in performance. In short, Zen 5 could be very exciting indeed.

We don't have all the details, but what we're hearing is very promising. Here's what we know about Zen 5 so far.
Zen 5 release date and availability
AMD confirmed in January 2024 that it was on track to launch Zen 5 sometime in the "second half of the year." Considering the launch of Zen 4 was in September 2022, we would expect to see Zen 5 desktop processors debut around the same timeframe, possibly with an announcement in the summer at Computex.

Read more