Transporter v2.0 gets Dropbox-like software reboot, new iOS and Android apps

Transporter_Environmental 6

Storing the odd Word document or cat photo on a cloud-based service like Dropbox or Google Drive is perfectly fine for users who don’t have a lot of sensitive data or large files they need to access on any device. But for users who want to better protect their files (and not be at the whim of hackers potentially compromising a public cloud), or who want to stop paying a monthly fee to rent a significant amount of cloud storage space, the Transporter could be the answer.

After a successful Kickstarter campaign that funded the production of the first-generation Transporters just this January, the Connected Data team behind this innovative product is already onto version 2.0, which brings a complete redesign of the software that better mimics the Dropbox interface and features, as well as new mobile apps for both iOS and Android devices.

Basically, the Transporter is a device that lets you store your files locally but makes them accessible on any device with an Internet connection. You can also create your own peer-to-peer network of Transporters that are spread out throughout the world so that family members who live apart from each other can share photos and other files securely. (Now that Connected Data is in talks to merge with Drobo, the easy-to-scale storage device company that Connected Data CEO Geoff Barrall also founded, we wonder if Barrall will be bringing some of the Transporter’s connectivity and personal cloud features to Drobo hardware as well.)

Underneath its black, fanless case, the Transporter is just a standard 2.5-inch hard drive that is perpetually connected to the Internet through an Ethernet cable (no built-in Wi-Fi connectivity). It comes with either 1TB ($300) or 2TB ($400) of internal storage, or is available as just the case ($200) so you can plug in your own hard drive to keep the device flexible and up to date.

As Jim Sherhart, vice president of marketing, reassured us last week, the hardware of the second-gen Transporter is identical to the earlier model. Since all the improvements to the Transporter v2.0 are on the software side, early adopters can keep using the same device but will need to download the new interface and spend some time configuring the new features. For example, “connect folders” no longer exist so users might have to move files into other folders to share with specific users instead.

Dropbox users who give the Transporter a try will find the new interface and features for the device to be much more intuitive. Not only will they be able to drag and drop files onto the Transporter, and right-click on files and folders to manage them, they’ll also be able to email links to share specific files with others – a feature users from other cloud services will appreciate. The sync feature is also more sophisticated this time around. You can control things down to the specific folder that you want to sync (or not). This is particularly useful if you like to store your movie collection in the cloud so that you can access it when you travel, but don’t necessarily want to download every movie every time you connect to your device – especially when all you need is to grab a single file from the Transporter.

To go along with Transporter v2.0’s new software features, the company is also releasing a new iOS and Android app today. While the new iOS app is an update to the one launched in March, the Android app is completely new and was one of the most requested “feature” from users and Kickstarter backers, according to Sherhart. Both apps are available for free from their respective app stores.

The first-gen Transporter is already available from online retailers. If you can wait a couple of weeks, the Transporter v2.0 will hit stores in the second week of June.

Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Write music with your voice, make homemade cheese

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Product Review

The new iPad Mini certainly isn’t a beauty, but it performs like a beast

Apple’s new iPad Mini has beastly performance, fluid iOS 12 software, and good battery life. It also looks like it came straight out of 2015, because the design hasn’t been changed. Here are our impressions of Apple’s new 7.9-inch…
Photography

Paper designs digitize in real time using an Illustrator-connected paper tablet

Love graphic design, but prefer the feel of real paper? The new Moleskine Paper Tablet - Creative Cloud Connected syncs with Adobe Illustrator in real time, turning paper sketches into digital drawings.
Mobile

iPad Air vs. iPad Mini: Which new tablet from Apple is best for you?

Apple has unveiled two new iPad models, including a new iPad Air and a new iPad Mini. Both devices have a lot to offer. But which iPad is right for your needs? We put the iPad Air and iPad Mini to the test to find out.
Computing

Oculus shows off the Rift S, plans to phase out its original VR headset

Oculus plans to phase out its flagship Rift VR headset for its newly created Rift S. The Rift S made its debut this week at the 2019 Game Developers Conference and is expected to be released in spring 2019.
Computing

Secure your Excel documents with a password by following these quick steps

Excel documents are used by people and businesses all over the world. Given how often they contain sensitive information, it makes sense to keep them from the wrong eyes. Thankfully, it's easy to secure them with a password.
Computing

Intel teases 9th-generation Core i9 mobile processors at GDC 2019

Intel teased its new 9th-generation Intel Core i9 processors at GDC 2019. The company offered few specifics about the hardware, but a leak from late February provides insight into what the new processors might offer.
Computing

Get the best of both worlds by sharing your data on MacOS and Windows

Compatibility issues between Microsoft Windows and Apple MacOS may have diminished sharply over the years, but that doesn't mean they've completely disappeared. Here's how to make an external drive work between both operating systems.
Computing

Give your MacBook Air some added style with one of these great cases or sleeves

Whether you’re looking for added protection or a stylish flourish, you’re in the right place for the best MacBook Air cases. We have form-hugging cases, luxurious covers, and padded sleeves priced from $10 to $130. Happy shopping!
Computing

Intel Command Center lays foundation for next year’s ‘Arctic Sound’ GPU

Intel revealed its new Command Center driver software at GDC 2019. The updated interface will control current Intel integrated graphics and also lays the groundwork for next year's Intel video card.
Web

How much!? British Airways glitch results in $4.2M quote for family vacation

Website errors sometimes cause flight prices to display at way below the correct price. But British Airways recently experienced the opposite issue when it tried to charge a family more than $4 million for a vacation in Mexico.
Computing

Want to save a webpage as a PDF? Just follow these steps

Need to quickly save and share a webpage? The best way is to learn how to save a webpage as a PDF file, as they're fully featured and can handle images and text with ease. Here's how.
Computing

G-Sync and FreeSync can make your games look better, but which is best?

There are some subtle differences between the two adaptive refresh technology offerings, and they affect cost, performance, and compatibility. Nvidia may have released it's feature first, but in recent years AMD has stepped up to the plate…
Computing

Problems with installing or updating Windows 10? Here's how to fix them

Upgrading to the newest version of Windows 10 is usually a breeze, but sometimes you run into issues. Never fear though. Our guide will help you isolate the issue at hand and solve it in a timely manner.