Gateway Unveils 6GB MP3 Photo Jukebox

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The newest model, the GCM-6, provides 6GB of storage for housing up to 1,500 MP3 songs, putting a vast library of music favorites always within reach.  Sleek enough to fit within a pocket or purse, the Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox is about the size of a deck of cards and weighs just 3.4 ounces.  Its stylish new look includes an attractive two-tone silver and black design.
   
Unlike some other popular MP3 players on the market, the Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox comes with a replaceable and rechargeable battery, which is a significant advantage, since even rechargeable batteries are perishable.  The replaceable battery provides eight to ten hours of continuous music playback on a single charge.

Stores Up to 2,000 Digital Photos

As an added bonus, the Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox can store up to 2,000 digital photos, a handy feature for vacation travelers who require back-up storage to their primary camera.  It can display digital photos one by one or in a slideshow format, which is enhanced by the color screen.  The transferring of photos to the MP3 Photo Jukebox is simple as connecting the included USB 2.0 cable between the jukebox and digital camera and following the user prompts.  Unlike other players on the market, it can grab photos off cameras or flash cards without add-on interface cards.

Napster To Go — Unlimited Access to Over a Million Songs
   
The Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox comes ready to download music content directly from a variety of industry standard sources including Napster To Go which provides unlimited access to more than a million songs for a modest monthly fee of just $14.95.  With purchase, Gateway customers that are new Napster members will get the first three months of Napster to Go free. While Gateway customers can chose to listen to songs ripped from their CDs or purchased per track online, they can also use Napster To Go to fill their MP3 Photo Jukebox with the songs they want — a real value for those who prefer to sample new artists before purchasing individual tracks or albums.

Small Size; Big Sound
   
The device measures only 3.8in x 2.3in x 0.7in (L x W x D), yet it’s big in sound.  The Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox delivers rich sound in clear, crisp high-fidelity.  Music can be browsed by album, artist, genre, track or playlist, while 20 different equalizer settings and various modes such as shuffle and repeat enable users to tailor the music mix to suit their own personal preferences.
   
The Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox includes Windows Media Player 10, which
provides more music and more choices to Gateway customers, such as built-in access to a broad range of digital music services.  Windows Media Player 10 provides an Auto Sync feature that automatically synchronizes customer’s digital music collections and photos from a PC to their new Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox.

Convenient Accessories Maximize Listening Pleasure
   
The Gateway Photo Jukebox works with a wide range of portable music accessories including standard FM transmitters such as the Belkin Tunecast II Mobile FM Transmitter, so enthusiasts can enjoy their personal music library through any FM stereo receiver whether it’s in the car, via their PC or home stereo.  Suggested retail pricing is only $39.99.
   
The Gateway Belt/Armband Clip keeps the MP3 Photo Jukebox secure while users are on the go.  Built of lightweight, textured plastic for a more secure fit around the waist or arm, it features a durable armband that can be easily adjusted to fit most users.  Suggested retail pricing is only $19.99.
   
A removable and rechargeable Gateway replacement battery allows the user to determine how many continuous hours of playtime are needed.  Suggestedretail pricing is only $19.99.

Pricing and Availability
   
The Gateway MP3 Photo Jukebox comes with an AC Adapter, soft cover bag, camera connection cable and ear bud headphones for the low price of just $249.99.  It will be available directly from Gateway and at leading electronics retailers.

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