irock! introduces new 830 MP3/WMA/FM player

The new irock! 830 comes equipped with 128MB of built-in memory allowing for storage of more than 4 hours of skip- free digital music.

The irock! 830 enables consumers to switch freely between their own personal music collection and local radio stations. The player includes a built-in FM tuner with 20 programmable presets, so finding regularly used stations is a breeze. In addition, the irock! 830 features a sleek, ultra- compact design — smaller than a business card and only 0.6″ thick — making the player perfect for mobile consumers. The 830 features an amazing 30 hours of continuous playback with one AA battery.

“Consumers are increasingly looking for high-quality, simple and flexible portable devices to enjoy their favorite music on the go,” said Randy Cavaiani, executive vice president for FID. “The irock! 830 fits the bill with ultra-long battery life and one-button selection of digital tunes or FM stereo — simplicity and versatility that consumers can appreciate, with the quality that users have come to expect from irock!”

The irock! 830 supports ID3 tags, displaying artist, title, and album information on a cool blue backlit LCD display with selectable contrast. A USB interface provides high-speed downloading from both PC and the Mac. The unit comes complete with high-fidelity earphones, a carrying case and a neck strap.

A full software suite is included: MUSICMATCH(R) Jukebox, Moodlogic (for creation of custom mixes based on mood), and MP3i Creator for adding pictures, lyrics, and text to any MP3 file. The 830 is also compatible with iTunes Jukebox software for Macintosh.

The irock! 830 will be available shortly at key retailers including CompUSA, Good Guys, and Fry’s, for an estimated retail price of $99.99. In addition, the irock! 860, featuring 256MB of storage ($149.99 retail) will be available in September. Consumers can buy the 830 and download hundreds of music titles for free at www.myirock.com.

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