Sennheiser’s Compact Noise-Canceling Duo

The new models are generally similar, with the PXC300 featuring a clever, collapsible headband/earpiece assembly for even greater portability and convenience, plus several additional refinements that enhance performance and quality.  Both the PXC300 and PXC150 designs produce the natural, musical sound that experienced audio buffs expect from any headphones carrying the Sennheiser name, making on-the-go personal music listening or in-flight entertainment true pleasures.  Both models exploit the firm’s proprietary, spiral-embossed Duofol diaphragm and bass-tube technology to deliver linear, extended response for accurate, musical playback; the PXC300 model boasts both slightly more extended infra-bass, and slightly greater peak output potential.

Because Sennheiser realized that even the best noise-canceling design is of no use if not immediately at hand when needed, their new PXC300 employs a robust, quick-folding collapsible system to offer superior portability, fitting easily into a supplied protective travel case little bigger than a CD wallet.  Appearing nearly identical to the fully deployed PXC300, the non-collapsible PXC150 system includes a convenient drawstring vinyl carry-bag.

For the best performance and most transparent active noise cancellation, the PXC300 enjoys Sennheiser’s latest NoiseGard Advance system, a newly refined active-noise-canceling circuit design that eliminates the potential, common among less sophisticated ANC systems, for audible hiss.  Sennheiser’s latest evolution also reduces susceptibility to interference from cell phones and other radio-frequency sources.  The PXC300 also incorporates a new super-soft leatherette ear cushions that increase passive (higher-frequency) noise reduction while also enhancing comfort.  The result is stable, enjoyable listening in real-world environments, with remarkably effective noise cancellation: as much as 15 dB below 1 kHz—a thirty-fold reduction of total low-frequency noise power.

Both the Sennheiser PXC300 and PXC150 designs take two AAA batteries (supplied, with the PXC300) for their slim, in-line battery-pack/volume controls, from which they deliver impressive noise-canceling life of up to 80 hours. But unlike many ANC designs, even with totally depleted cells the PXC300 and PXC150 continue to function as full-fidelity passive headphones.

Sennheiser’s PXC150 and PXC300 systems are supplied with jack-adapters covering all portable, airline, and in-home listening needs, and with leatherette carry-bag (PXC150) or travel-case (PXC300).  They are available immediately, at manufacturer’s suggested retail prices of $129.95 and $219.95 respectively.

          Sennheiser PXC300Sennheiser PXC150

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