uKeg is a pressurized growler that keeps your beer from going flat

If you drink a lot of craft beer, you’ve undoubtedly encountered the following dilemma: Either you wind up with more empty bottles than you can possibly fit in your recycle bin each week, or you get your brew by the growler and inevitably have it go flat before you finish it all. The only other options are to downsize the amount you drink (not likely) or fully commit to your craft beer addiction and buy yourself a kegerator. Neither option is particularly enticing, but thankfully somebody has cooked up an alternative solution.

ukeg infographicFreshly launched on Kickstarter just last week, uKeg is a pressurized stainless steel growler that can hold either 64 or 128 ounces of beer (comes in two sizes), and keep it fresh for considerably longer than its average glass counterpart. How, you ask? The secret lies in the uKeg’s unique pressurization cap. Hidden inside the cap there’s a little slot designed to hold a CO2 cartridge, as well as a selector dial on the cap that allows you to regulate the amount of gas it releases. To help you get a sense of how pressurized the growler’s interior chamber is, the tap is outfitted with a brass pressure gauge.

Related: The ultimate beer chiller spins your suds down to 40 degrees in 40 seconds

Truth be told, this isn’t the first contraption in the world that helps you keep your beer from going flat. There are cheaper options available out there, but uKeg seems to have two things going for it that other products do not: durability and plain old aesthetic appeal. The double-wall stainless steel enclosure is far more durable than glass, and all the accompanying brass fittings give it a sort of steampunkish look that’s sure to turn a few heads at your local brewpub.

Unsurprisingly, the project has already blasted past its initial $75K funding goal, and is currently sitting on more than double that amount with more than 50 days left in the campaign. If you back the project now, you can lock down a uKeg for about 99 bucks. Barring any hiccups in the manufacturing process, GrowlerWerks expects to ship the first batch of uKegs to backers sometime next spring. Find out more here.

Emerging Tech

The grid of the future will be powered by … giant subterranean bagpipes?

In order to transition to a more renewable-focused energy system, we need to scale up our grid storage capacity --- and our existing methods aren't going to cut it. Could compressed air be the key?
Smart Home

Our favorite coffee makers make flavorful cups of joe from the comforts of home

Whether you're looking for a simple coffee maker to get you through the morning or a high-end brewer that will impress your taste buds and your friends, you'll find some of the best coffee makers around on this list.
Smart Home

The best sous vide machines cook your food perfectly, every single time

Want to make four-star meals from the comforts of your own kitchen? Here are the best sous vide machines available right now, whether you prefer simple immersion circulators or something more complex.
Photography

Capture life in every direction with the best 360 cameras

While 360 cameras are still a new technology, that doesn't mean there's not a few that are worth a look. Whether you want to shoot from the middle or just need a simple, affordable option, here are the best 360 cameras on the market.
Mobile

The 15 most stylish iPhone docks and charging stands for your device

The right iPhone dock does more than just hold your phone. If you’re looking for the perfect dock for your bedroom, or one to sit discretely on your office desk, there’s a good chance you’ll find it here.
Emerging Tech

Gravitational forces at heart of Milky Way shaped this star cluster like a comet

Hubble has captured the stunning Messier 62 cluster. The cluster is warped, with a long tail which stretches out to form a shape like a comet. It is thought this distortion is due to Messier 62's proximity to the center of the galaxy.
Emerging Tech

Burgers are just the beginning: Embracing the future of lab-grown everything

You’ve almost certainly heard of the 'farm to fork' movement, but what about 'lab to table'? Welcome to the fast-evolving world of lab-grown meat. Is this the future of food as we know it?
Emerging Tech

Troubleshooting Earth

It’s no secret that humans are killing the planet. Some say it’s actually so bad that we’re hurtling toward a sixth major extinction event -- one which we ourselves are causing. But can technology help us undo the damage we’ve…
Emerging Tech

Inside the Ocean Cleanup’s ambitious plan to rid the ocean of plastic waste

In 2013, Boyan Slat crowdfunded $2.2 million to fund the Ocean Cleanup, a nonprofit organization that builds big, floating trash collectors and sets them out to sea, where they’re designed to autonomously gobble up garbage.
Emerging Tech

Climeworks wants to clean the atmosphere with a fleet of truck-sized vacuums

Using machines that resemble jet engines, Climeworks wants to fight climate change by extracting CO2 from thin air. The gas can then be sold to carbonated drink and agriculture companies, or sequestered underground.
Emerging Tech

How 3D printing has changed the world of prosthetic limbs forever

When he was 13 years old, Christophe Debard had his leg amputated. Here in 2019, Debard's Print My Leg startup helps others to create 3D-printed prostheses. Welcome to a growing revolution!
Emerging Tech

Geoengineering is risky and unproven, but soon it might be necessary

Geoengineering is a field dedicated to purposely changing the world's climate using technology. Call it 'playing god' if you must; here's why its proponents believe it absolutely must happen.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Earth Day, indoor container farming, robot submarines

Today on Digital Trends Live, we discuss how technology intersects with Earth Day, a new Tim Cook biography, indoor container farming, robot spy submarines, A.I. death metal, and more.
Gaming

Google’s Stadia is the future of gaming, and that’s bad news for our planet

Google’s upcoming Stadia cloud gaming service, and its competitors, are ready to change the way gamers play, but in doing so they may kick off a new wave of data center growth – with unfortunate consequences for the environment.