Man claims to find Mars base using Google Mars

Google Mars Martines location highlight

Mars has fascinated humanity since pre-historic times, but the notion of little green men and Martian Society really got its start in the 19th century when Italian astronomer Giovani Schiaparelli noted “canali” on the visible surface of Mars. American Percival Lowell took the idea much further from 1885 to 1908 with a series of three books detailing his observations of the Martian surface and the intelligent civilization that he believed existed there. Now in the 21st century a man named David Martines claims to have found evidence of intelligent life on Mars—this time in the form of a long cylindrical base. And he didn’t find it with a telescope: He found it using Mars surface imagery available via Google Mars.

According to Martines’ calculations, the object is more than 700 feet long, 150 feet wide, and has red and blue strips on its white surface. He’s dubbed the visible anomaly “BioStation Alpha” because he assumes it either housed or houses living creatures.

Google Mars Martines location highlight

“It could be a power station or it could be a biological containment or it could be a glorified garage—hope it’s not a weapon,” Martines says in a video he posted to YouTube. Martines speculates the station could belong to the U.S. NASA space agency, but doubts it would be possible for humans to get that much material to Mars in secret. “I don’t know if NASA even knows about this.”

Before jumping to the conclusion that aliens have set up a surveillance post to watch I Love Lucy reruns as they whisk past the Red Planet, it’s important to note that Google’s Mars imagery pulls from information published under the JMARS data project, and is comprised of different types of filtered imagery from a number of different sources and probes from present day (like Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey) all the way back to the 1960s and 70s. Google has also done some of its own work on the imagery, adding high-resolution images from infrared and other sources to heighten detail on points of interest. Imagery in Google Mars is far from a high-resolution photograph: It’s an enormous amount of highly-specialized, highly-processed data from a number of sources cleverly stitched together to resemble a 2D or 3D flyover of Mars.

Mars enthusiasts looking to follow up on Martines’ discover should have little difficulty finding other visual anomalies in Google’s Mars presentation. A few minutes of random searching in the area surrounding Martines’ discovery—at 49’19.73″N 29 33’06.53″W—turned up a few more suspicious blips nearby. All in all, Martines’ discovery—and the media’s reaction to it—may serve as a testament to how badly humans want to believe there’s life on Mars

Martines has removed his original videos announcing the discovery from YouTube, but a few sites still have them available.

Emerging Tech

InSight’s heat probe will dig 16 feet beneath the surface of Mars

New images from NASA's InSight mission to Mars have confirmed that the lander succeeded in setting the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package instrument onto the surface, from where a self-hammering spike will burrow downwards.
Emerging Tech

Underground volcanoes could explain possible liquid water on Mars

Last year scientists discovered there could be liquid water on Mars. Now a research team argues that for there to be liquid water, there must be an underground source of heat -- and they believe underground volcanoes could be responsible.
Emerging Tech

After a record-setting 15 years, NASA ends Opportunity rover’s tour of Mars

NASA has officially called it quits on its record-setting Mars rover Opportunity, eight months after last hearing from the lander. The Rover landed on the Red Planet in early 2004.
Emerging Tech

Mars One Ventures’ promise of a one-way ticket to planet goes up in red dust

Mars One Ventures -- which once hoped to establish a permanent human settlement on Mars -- has filed for bankruptcy. It's the end of the road for a company that promised big, unfeasible things.
Home Theater

Here's how to turn off subtitles on Netflix, no matter the device

Subtitles are great if you want or need them, but they can be a major headache if you’ve somehow turned them on by accident and can’t figure out how to get rid of them. Don't worry, it's not as complicated as it seems.
Home Theater

Everything to know about Sling TV: Channels, pricing, and more

Sling TV has grown a great deal since its launch. Now there are more channels and more packages to chose from, with prices to match, and more is being added all the time. Everything you need to know is right here.
Movies & TV

You should read these epic sci-fi novels before they become blockbuster films

You can get ahead of the next crop of science-fiction movies coming out of Hollywood by picking up the books that inspired them. We compiled a list of books you can add to your reading list now to get a glimpse of the future.
Movies & TV

Oscar Effects

Every year, five films are nominated for an Academy Award in the “Visual Effects” category. Each of the projects nominated this year offer a unique, inside look at the amazing tricks filmmakers and their talented effects teams use to…
Movies & TV

Eye-popping Alita: Battle Angel delivers a beautifully hollow cyberpunk spectacle

With Alita: Battle Angel, Robert Rodriguez and James Cameron finally deliver a cyberpunk adventure that keeps the action high with groundbreaking visual effects, even when the story falls short.
Home Theater

ATSC 3.0: The next-gen TV update explained

ATSC 3.0 is the next major update to the broadcast standard we use today. Will this be the second coming of free, over-the-air TV? We're here to explain everything about the new standard.
Movies & TV

Ben Affleck explains why he is no longer working on The Batman

Warner Bros. Pictures' The Batman will come out in June 2021, but it needs a new star. Ben Affleck has confirmed he's hanging up the cape and cowl once and for all and explained why on Jimmy Kimmel Live!
Podcasts

Apple's wild TV service, Jason Momoa joins Dune, Alita's epic battle

This week on Between the Streams, we'll talk about Apple's radical new TV streaming service, Robert Rodriguez and James Cameron's epic new CG adventure Alita: Battle Angel, Hulu's multiple new Marvel series, and much more.
Movies & TV

Jason Momoa and Oscar Isaac may join cast of the star-studded Dune reboot

Aquaman and Poe Dameron -- i.e., Jason Momoa and Oscar Isaac -- are two of the latest actors rumored to be joining the star-studded cast of Dune, Denis Villeneuve's epic adaptation of Frank Herbert's best-selling sci-fi novel.
Movies & TV

The Breaking Bad sequel might air on Netflix before it arrives on AMC

A Breaking Bad sequel starring Jesse Pinkman (and, possibly, Walter White) is on the way from series creator Vince Gilligan, and you might get your first look at it on Netflix, not traditional cable.