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Tesla pushes Model X back to 2014 to focus on Model S

Tesla Model X
Image used with permission by copyright holder

The Tesla Model S has been a staggering sales success by electric car terms. The electric car company headed by Elon Musk is on track to surpass 2012’s record of selling 20,000 of the sleek EVs in annual sales for 2013.

Riding high on the Model S triumph, Tesla has decided to continue pushing the sports sedan, delaying the eagerly anticipated Model X. Slated to go on sale later this year, the Model X will be pushed to late 2014, according to the LA Times.

Based upon the Model S, the Model X is supposed to have all the benefits of a minivan without the unsavory looks. Complete with gullwing doors, the Model X takes family hauling to all-new levels of excitement and design daring.

We’re disappointed in Tesla’s decision. While we understand that the electric automaker must keep working on a known entity before it can divert to something new, we ultimately see production pauses as a sign of weakness. We needn’t look past Fisker and the delayed Atlantic model for a perfect example.

On a bit of a higher note, however, Tesla has announced it will repay all of its $465 million in loans from the U.S. Department of Energy by 2017, five years ahead of schedule. It’s news like this helps assuage our niggling fears that things might be a bit off for the fledgling automaker based upon the Model X delay.

When we learn of an official launch date of the Model X, we’ll be sure to bring it to you.

Nick Jaynes
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Nick Jaynes is the Automotive Editor for Digital Trends. He developed a passion for writing about cars working his way…
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