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Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse review: Earthbound

View of the Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse from above.
Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse
MSRP $150.00
“The Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse comes at a cost with very little noteworthy in return.”
Pros
  • Comfortable left and right clicks
  • Satisfying switches
  • Clean design
  • Long battery life
Cons
  • Too expensive for what it is
  • Awkward side buttons
  • No PTFE feet
  • Too heavy
  • USB Type-C dongle feels impractical

The best gaming mice are usually made by a handful of companies that tend to stay within the world of peripherals, like Razer and Logitech. However, if you look hard enough, you’ll find mice made by Alienware.

Alienware has been around since the dawn of PC gaming and while decades have passed, the company has never failed to raise eyebrows in the design category. While this isn’t its first rodeo with gaming mice, what we have today is the Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse AW720M for $150.

Unlike its prebuilt PC sibling that features eye-popping cases, the Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse AW720M design is forgettable.

Design and comfort

The Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse is extremely comfortable for point-and-click operation. The left and right clicks aren’t the traditional two pieces of plastic – they have some concave which cradles my index and middle finger during use. I need to give credit to Alienware here because I have never used a mouse that felt so sculpted. Alienware’s new mouse features a more simplistic design than its predecessor, the AW610M. There wasn’t much to talk about with the AW610M other than the fact that it looks like a Banshee from Halo and the fact that it operates wired or wireless. 

In between the buttons is the scroll wheel and it has a rubbery, tire tread-like texture that isn’t loud during operation, but it isn’t adjustable, therefore if you’re not a fan of notched scroll wheels, then look away. 

Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse plug-in port.

Side buttons are the make or break it for me when shopping for a proper gaming mouse because they’re so darn convenient to use. Since this is an ambidextrous mouse, side buttons are on both sides, which is good. However, the opposite side buttons cannot be removed or covered, which bothered me a ton. Fortunately, the side buttons on the opposite side can be deactivated within Alienware Command Center, but the overall comfort was hindered by this.

In 2022, the most popular gaming mice have become so light that they no longer can be doubled as paperweights. However, with a weight of 89 grams, the Tri-Mode is extremely heavy compared to most other gaming mice of this size. The weight of the Alienware mouse is somewhat surprising because this mouse doesn’t look bulky at all — I sincerely have no clue where all of its heft comes from. The weight of this mouse isn’t exactly a bad thing as there are people who prefer heavier mice, but gamers generally want their mice as light as possible. 

if you’re not a fan of notched scroll wheels, then look away. 

The AW720M comes in two colors: Lunar Light (white) and Side of the Moon (black). I received the Lunar Light version for review, as the Side of the Moon version won’t be available until April 19. The RGB on the Tri-Mode isn’t out of this world, but for some reason, I love it. The only RGB on this mouse is from the classic Alienware logo. I never really understood the point of having RGB on a mouse … your hand covers it 90% of the time. However, the way the logo gleams in conjunction with the white finish looks great on my desk.

Underneath the mouse is where you’ll find its power switch, DPI switch, and another switch that allows you to pick your connectivity method (more on that later.) You won’t find any PTFE feet, which is disappointing for a mouse at this price. 

Sensors and switches

View of the Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse from the front side.

Alienware didn’t disclose what type of switches are in the Tri-Mode, but they feel and sound fantastic. For starters, this isn’t a silent mouse at all — the switches are very loud, but they complement that satisfying click very well.

Again, there isn’t a name given for the sensor used within the Tri-Mode, but this mouse features a maximum DPI of 26,000, keeping it on par with most other gaming mice at this price point. Of course, the DPI is adjustable and Alienware allows five DPI profiles, which can be toggled underneath the mouse. I can’t blame Alienware for putting the button there because many other gaming mice do too, but it would’ve been nice to see a different spot, like underneath the scroll wheel.

This isn’t a silent mouse at all — the switches are very loud, but they complement that satisfying click very well.

The name Tri-Mode refers to the connectivity options you have for this mouse. The Tri-Mode features 2.4 GHz wireless, Bluetooth, and of course, wired. There isn’t much to say here, this is a feature in almost all wireless gaming mice on the market now and it kind of feels like Alienware ran out of ideas when it came to picking a name for this mouse.

According to Alienware, the 2.4 GHz dongle will last you 140 hours and up to 420 hours on standard Bluetooth. I used the mouse on each of its modes of connectivity for a day, and I didn’t notice any input lag whether I was using 2.4 GHz, Bluetooth or wired, so that’s nice. After testing, I connected the mouse back to Bluetooth because that was the most practical method of connectivity in my mind. 

In order to achieve the 2.4 GHz wireless performance with the Tri-Mode, you need to use the included dongle. This sounds normal, but it doesn’t have a USB Type-A connector as most do– it has Type-C. USB Type-C is slowly becoming the standard when it comes to charging devices or connecting peripherals. However, most devices either have just one port, which may be occupied, or none at all. While you can always get a Type-A adapter, you’re missing out on practicality. With that said, I got a new laptop and finally got to utilize the Type-C port.

Gaming performance

View of the Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless Gaming Mouse from above.

One of my favorite game publishers, Bethesda Softworks released its newest title, Ghostwire: Tokyo. I’m not going to go into detail about the game because you can check out our review on it, but one of the things I enjoyed most about this game was its Dr. Strange-like spell casting. When it comes to gaming, I’m not the type to play toxic first-person shooters, so I don’t put too much thought into which mouse will be light enough for me to snap to targets as fast as possible. 

I don’t have the steadiest hands, so the weight of the Tri-Mode was just right for me as it wasn’t too heavy like a Logitech G502 or too light like the MSI Clutch GM41 Lightweight.

While it comes with RGB and DPI that’s through the roof, at $150, this mouse should’ve come with PTFE feet. Besides that, this mouse is fine for gaming, but I wouldn’t recommend it over something more feasible for the price.

Our take

The Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless AW720 is fine but forgettable unless you’re a die-hard Alienware fan. 

Are there any alternatives?

At the price of $150, there are a ton of better gaming mice that may even cost less coin. For the same price, but lighter weight, the Logitech G Pro X Superlight Wireless, weighs just 63 grams and is the top pick on our best gaming mice list.

For more weight, more buttons, and less money, there’s the Razer Basilisk Ultimate Hyperspeed Wireless, which is $120 and has 11 programable buttons, but a weight of 107 grams.

How long will it last?

The included warranty on the Alienware Tri-Mode Wireless AW720 is a good two years and I firmly believe it’ll last longer than that, especially the lack of wobble from the side buttons. 

Should you buy it?

Honestly, unless you’re an Alienware fan, my answer is no. For $150, there are much better options on the market that offer more features and less weight for either the same price or less. 

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