China’s Government Crackdowns (Even More) on Distasteful Internet Use

no-pornThe Chinese government has launched yet another attack against internet pornography, with officials expecting the anti-porn program to last until the end of May 2010.

To help lead the way, WAP site registration will have to undergo additional scrutiny, with each site’s registration information verified before it goes live. Furthermore, the government also will go beyond WAP sites, and will also target third-party payment companies, and others who are involved in providing online pornography to Chinese internet users.

“If they do not take up proper actions, they will be held for the breach of duty,” according to a statement reported on by Chinese media. “In those serious cases, the corporate representatives will be forced to apologize to the public and promise to correct their wrong-doings in public.”

Some web hosts in Shanghai, Henan, Zhejiang and Jiangxi are now saying some customers are calling in to complain they can no longer access their own personal Web sites. Furthermore, ISPs are no longer allowed to host personal websites — only businesses and companies approved by the government — can have individual Web sites.

The so-called great wall of China has kicked thousands of PC users off of the internet, with YouTube, twitter, Facebook and Flickr also reprimanded for various reasons. YouTube came under fire in March after videos highlighting the situation in Tibet were promoted by Chinese users.

Along with a crackdown on internet porn, the government also is leading yet another attempt to limit piracy — several Chinese websites known for hosting copyrighted music and movies were disconnected.

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