Internet Explorer 9 to include anti-tracking feature

internet explorer 9 to include anti tracking feature 12 7 add list a webThe next release of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer will let users enable “tracking protection” to control what third-party sites are able to track online. The announcement comes just a few days after the Federal Trade Commission proposed instituting a “do not track” list for the Internet akin to the “do not call” for telemarketing.

The feature will allow users to create lists of sites to block from tracking. The tracking protection lists can then be shared with other users. Making and subscribing to the lists can be done by anyone — individuals, companies, or organizations — and the sites contained blocked on the lists can be customized. Users will be able to subscribe to multiple lists that could potentially cover a broad range websites.

When users visit a site that’s contained in their tracking protection list, IE9 will limit data requests between the site and browser preventing cookies and extraneous scripts from running. This, obviously, may inhibit some websites from performing legitimate functions like showing shopping recommendations based on browsing history. It’s not immediately clear if the tracking protection will prevent sites from displaying ads normally, as Adblock plug-in for Mozilla’s Firefox currently does.

“Consumers understand that they have a relationship with the site they visit directly, whose address is clearly visible to them. The modern Web though means that websites include content from many other sites as well,” Peter Cullen, Microsoft’s Chief Privacy Strategist said in a statement. “These “third-party” sites are in position to potentially track consumers, via cookies and other technology mechanisms. This creates a potential trade-off for those consumers with privacy concerns.”

The anti-tracking feature is expected to be included in the IE9 release candidate expected to ship early next year.

Computing

Just when you thought spam was dead, it’s back and worse than ever

Spam emails might seem like an outdated way to spread malware, but in 2018 they are proving to be the most effective attack vector thanks to new techniques and tricks.
Computing

Having issues with Microsoft Edge? Here's how to fix the most common problems

If you're feeling frustrated with Microsoft Edge, or have run into a serious problem with Windows 10's built-in browser, take a look at these common issues and the solutions that can help you get back on track.
Mobile

The 100 best Android apps turn your phone into a jack-of-all-trades

Choosing which apps to download is tricky, especially given how enormous and cluttered the Google Play Store has become. We rounded up 100 of the best Android apps and divided them neatly, each suited for a different occasion.
Mobile

Grab your fork and dig in: Android 9.0 Pie is now being served

It's time to dig in, as the new version of Android is here: Android 9.0 Pie. Is it worth getting excited about? You bet! Here are all the new features you'll want to try out in Android 9.0 Pie.
Computing

At Def Con, children show how easy it can be to hack an election

How hard is it to hack a voting machine or government website? Well, it turns out that it is literally child's play. Def Con tasked a group of children with hacking replica government websites, and many proved successful.
Smart Home

Samsung SmartThings adds A.I.-based Wi-Fi for faster, smarter home networking

Samsung introduced the SmartThings Wifi, an A.I.-based multifunction mesh networking router with an integrated smart home hub. The device intelligently allocates network speed and bandwidth based on device and application needs.
Product Review

5 generations later, Microsoft's Surface Pro is still the best 2-in-1 out there

At first glance, the 2017 Surface Pro looks like an incremental update to the Surface Pro 4, which was already our favorite detachable tablet. But does the newest version earn its own place at the top of the 2-in-1 heap?
Computing

Intel’s ninth-generation CPUs could launch on October 1

New rumors point to an October 1 release date for Intels' next-generation CPUs. The 9900K, 9700K, and 9600K could all debut in just a few weeks time, offering higher clocks and increased core counts.
Computing

AMD’s new 32-core Ryzen Threadripper chip is out, and you can get one for free

AMD’s 32-core Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX CPU is now available for $1,800. It’s compatible with motherboards packing the TR4 socket and the X399 chipset. The only other new Threadripper chip arriving this month will be the 2950X.
Computing

Google may launch two Pixelbook 2 laptops in October

Google may have a new Pixelbook design to show off in just a few weeks, with a new rumor suggesting two variations on the new laptop will be showcased at the start of October with new Intel hardware under the hood.
Gaming

Wage war on a budget with these fun and free first-person shooters

We all know about Halo and Call of Duty by now, but what about quality titles that won't cost you upward of $60? Check out our picks for the best free first-person shooter games from Paladins to Quake Champions.
Computing

Apple preps production of updated MacBook Air for a 2018 launch

To reach its rumored launch timeline of later this year for its low-cost notebook, Apple is expected to begin production of its updated MacBook Air soon. The sub-$1,000 laptop could launch as early as September or October.
Smart Home

White-hat Chinese hackers turn Alexa into a spy, briefly

A team of Chinese researchers revealed this week that they were able to use a cracked Amazon Echo to exploit a series of Alexa interface flaws to take control over an unteuched Echo running on the same network.
Music

Spotify vs. Pandora: Which music streaming service is better for you?

Which music streaming platform is best for you? We pit Spotify versus Pandora, two mighty streaming services with on-demand music and massive catalogs, comparing every facet of the two services to help you decide which is best.