Warner Bros admits defeat and offers refunds to Arkham Knight PC owners

warner bros admits defeat and offers refunds to arkham knight pc owners arkhamknight02
Warner Bros is acutely aware of the issues surrounding the PC version of Batman: Arkham Knight, so much so that any user who bought the game on Steam is now eligible for a refund, no matter how much time they’ve spent playing the game.

The post clarifies that users who don’t request a refund can expect more updates in the future, but lands on a concerning note with a warning that “we are going to continue to address the issues that we can fix and talk to you about the issues that we cannot fix.”

After Warner Bros pulled the PC port from shelves back in June, users hoped the firm would be able to use the subsequent period to smooth out some of the game-breaking bugs and performance issues that plagued the game’s release.

But it wasn’t meant to be, and many of the same problems persisted even with massive patching and updating. Users reported framerates in the single digits, as well as stuttering and crashing when driving the Batmobile.

In response, the Warner Bros representative explained that Windows 10 users simply needed 12GB of RAM or more in order to run the game well. According to the Steam hardware survey, only about 15 percent of machines tested have that much RAM.

With no satisfying answer to the massive problems that have plagued Arkham Knight’s PC release, Warner Bros has now recognized that it has no choice but to offer a refund to anyone who bought the game. Those who purchased the PC version were already gifted special DLC and previous games in the series for their patience, but that has done little to make up for the busted-up state of Arkham Knight. 

The refund offer is available until the end of 2015, and users who bought the season pass are free to return it along with the game, but not on its own. Although users reported an issue with the Steam Refund service, Valve has updated the post to note that any issues should have been solved by now.  

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