Soon, we’ll all be cyborgs: crowdfunded xNT biohacking implant ships this month

RFID Implant

After mounting a successful crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo toward the end of last year, Dangerous Things is now ready to ship its xNT implant to consumers later this month.

For those of you who may be unfamiliar, the xNT is an ISO/IEC 14443-A and fully NFC Type 2 compliant NTAG216 RFID chipset encased in a 2×12 mm cylindrical USP grade lead-free Schott 8625 biocompatible glass casing. In plain English, that basically means it’s a tiny capsule designed to be inserted into your body (usually in your hand) that’s outfitted with a special chip that allows you to interact with a wide variety of other NFC-equipped devices by simply waving your hand or entering a room.

Technologically speaking, the device isn’t particularly noteworthy. There already are a number of different wearable devices on the market that allow you to control things via NFC — rings, wristbands, and even NFC tags you can stick on stuff. The tech is fairly common, but what’s significant about xNT is that it’s one of the first ready-made DIY bio-hacking kits that’s aimed toward consumers. It ships with everything you need to implant it in your body.

Up until this point, most high-tech implants were either inserted by trained professionals, like doctors and surgeons who did it for medical purposes, or intrepid bio-hackers who were brave and/or crazy enough to do it themselves. This DIY kit changes everything — never before has there been such an easy way to become a cyborg.

The $99 kit ships with the xNT capsule contained in a sterile syringe, so you can insert it yourself, or head to a piercing or body modification specialist to give you a hand. Dangerous Things even sells a special “pain management kit” if you’re not sure whether you’re tough enough to handle the procedure.

As we mentioned before, you can already interact with and control NFC devices with a variety of different wearables, so while we’re not entirely convinced that implanting an NFC chip into your body is necessary at this point, it’s exciting to think about what the future of DIY implants might hold.

What do you think? Would you put one of these things in your body? Sound off in the comments below. 

Emerging Tech

CES 2019 recap: All the trends, products, and gadgets you missed

CES 2019 didn’t just give us a taste of the future, it offered a five-course meal. From 8K and Micro LED televisions to smart toilets, the show delivered with all the amazing gadgetry you could ask for. Here’s a look at all the big…
Smart Home

Amazon patents a technology to help Alexa fight fake voice attacks

Amazon filed a patent this month for a new technology that looks like it would help its digital assistant Alexa fight fake voice attacks that could potentially fool Alexa's biometric security protocols.
Wearables

Check out the four cool Swatch watches you can use for mobile payments

Swatch has announced its Swatchpay technology is now available in Switzerland, enabling mobile payments from your Swatch watch. It works in a similar way to Apple Pay and Google Pay. Here's everything about it.
Home Theater

Not chill: Netflix is hiking prices across all its tiers

Netflix has to get the billions of dollars it's spending on new content from somewhere. The streaming giant announced price hikes across the board, raising its monthly rates between $1 and $2 per tier in the next few months.
Apple

Rumors say Apple's AirPower wireless charger may finally be in production

At its September event in 2018, Apple unveiled the AirPower, a new wireless charging mat that will allow you to charge multiple devices at one time. It has not yet been released. Here's everything we know about the device so far.
Emerging Tech

Ford’s sweaty robot bottom can simulate 10 years of seat use in mere days

Ford has developed 'Robutt,' a sweaty robot bottom that's designed to simulate the effects of having a pair of human buttocks sitting on its car seats for thousands of hours. Check it out.
Emerging Tech

Want to know which drones are flying near you? There’s an app for that

Want to know what that mysterious drone buzzing over your head is up to? A new system developed by AirMap, Google Wing, and Kittyhawk.io could soon tell you -- via a map on your phone.
Emerging Tech

A Japanese hotel fires half its robot staff for being bad at their jobs

Japan’s oddball Henn na Hotel has fired half of its 243 robot staff. The reason? Because these labor-saving machines turned out to be causing way more problems than they were solving.
Emerging Tech

CERN plans to build a massive particle collider that dwarfs the LHC

CERN already has the world's biggest particle accelerator. Now it wants a bigger one. Meet the 9 billion euro Future Circular Collider that will allow physicists to extend their study of the universe and matter at the smallest level.
Emerging Tech

Forget fireworks. Japan will soon have artificial meteor showers on tap

Tokyo-based startup Astro Live Experiences is preparing to launch its first artificial meteor shower over Japan, serving as a showcase of its prowess in the space entertainment sector.
Cars

Robomart’s self-driving grocery store is like Amazon Go on wheels

Robomart's driverless vehicle is like an Amazon Go store on wheels, with sensors tracking what you grab from the shelves. If you don't want to shop online or visit the grocery store yourself, Robomart will bring the store to you.
Emerging Tech

Glowing space billboards could show ads in the night sky

Look up at the night sky in 2020 and you might see an ad for McDonald's floating among the stars. A Russian startup is working on a project that uses a constellation of small satellites in low-Earth orbit to create glowing ads.
Emerging Tech

New brainwave reader tells teachers if students are concentrating

Massachusetts-based startup BrainCo has developed brainwave-reading headbands which can reportedly help reveal if students are concentrating in class. Here's how they're being used.
Emerging Tech

Fears about kids’ screen use may have been overblown, Oxford researchers find

Many people take it as gospel that digital technologies are harmful to young people’s mental health. But is this true? A recent study from the University of Oxford takes a closer look.