This is the Qylatron — the next generation in security and bag check

this is the qylatron next generation in security and bag check screen shot 2015 11 19 at 3 27 02 pm
Your TSA pre-checked status may not carry as great of an advantage if this new security system goes into effect. Thanks to Qylur’s brand new Qylatron Entry Experience Solution, we may have finally found a more efficient way of getting through airport security.

The honeycomb-like machine is nothing short of the security system of the future — currently being tested at Levi’s Stadium, Home to both the 49ers and to some of the most sophisticated technology in the sports world (thanks Silicon Valley!), the Qylatron scans a visitor’s ticket, and then directs her to one of five microwave-sized pods to drop off her bags. The visitor walks through a metal detector, and by the time she’s reached the other side, she’ll either be able to retrieve her belongings (if nothing suspicious has been detected), or she’ll be locked out of the pod, alerting security to do a more thorough check.

Bags are examined within the Qylatron using a combination of X-rays, chemical sensors, and machine AI, making for a much more sophisticated system than those currently in place at large venues or airports. And because Qylur claims that it can scan 600 passengers with one bag each in just an hour and requires the help of just four human operatives, the Qylatron is being heralded as the most sophisticated security machine ever.

Already operational in Disneyland Paris, the Qylatron has a bright future ahead. The TSA recently launched an 18-month trial for the Qylatron to be implemented in airports across the country, and with California football fans currently experiencing the efficiency of the Qylatron at Levi’s Stadium, this strange new machine just may become the new standard in security. “We expect several more rollouts in 2016 across stadiums, amusement parks, and other large public venues,” Qylur CEO Lisa Dolev said in a Wired interview. 

So if you find yourself face-to-face with a Qylatron, step right up and don’t be alarmed. It’s just what 21st century screening looks like.

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