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Here’s why Europe gets fewer game demos packed with PlayStation VR

playstation vr europe fewer demos localization psvr02
If you live in North America, you’ll be able to try out 18 different game demos for free when you pick up a PlayStation VR headset, including titles like Until Dawn: Rush of Blood and Rez Infinite, but European PlayStation fans aren’t so lucky. Their version of PlayStation VR only comes with eight games, and Sony says this disparity boils down to localization troubles.

“Due to several considerations specific to our region, for example, age rating and localization requirements, there is a different in content between the U.S. and European VR demo disks,” Sony told Digital Spy. “We continue to explore the possibility of making further demos available for free download from the [PlayStation] Store.

European players will still have access to some of the PlayStation VR’s heavy hitters, including Guerrilla Games’ Rigs: Mechanized Combat League and Driveclub VR, but they’ll miss out on a VR-compatible version of the Resident Evil 7 biohazard “Kitchen Teaser.”

If you do get the North America version of PlayStation VR, we advise using caution with Resident Evil 7. Journalists who have tried out the teaser with the headset have reported feeling sick, some to the point of almost vomiting.

The demo disk is a great way to get a sense of the headset’s capabilities, but if you want to sink your teeth into a full game when you pick up the device, we recommend opting for the $500 bundle. The package includes a PlayStation Camera and PlayStation Move controllers — both of which can be purchased individually, should you already have one of them — as well as the game PlayStation VR Worlds. The mini-game collection includes the first-person shootout The London Heist, developed by The Getaway studio SIE London.

PlayStation VR will be available on October 13. If you want to get one a little bit early, we hope you like Taco Bell.

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Gabe Gurwin
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Gabe Gurwin has been playing games since 1997, beginning with the N64 and the Super Nintendo. He began his journalism career…
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