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Take charge of your hotel room with your voice assistant, Siri

“Hey Siri, turn up the temperature two degrees.” “Hey Siri, where’s the closest French restaurant?” The Aloft Hotel Group calls it “Project: Jetson.” The latest innovation in the Starwood brand’s tech test bed is Siri voice-controlled hotel rooms, according to Fast Company.

The voice-activated-room pilot program is taking place at an Aloft hotel in Boston. When guests go to their rooms for the first time instructions on the television explain how to set up voice activation. Each room has an iPad that guests can train to recognize their voices by speaking a few sentences.

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Four preset lighting modes are ready for your command. “Reset” adjusts the lighting the way it was when you first entered the room. “Relax” puts the lighting in a warmer, less harsh setting. “Revive” lights up the room “gently” in the morning. You can also say “Review” to turn on the TV.

In addition to controlling the lights and television, your personal room assistant can adjust the room temperature, play whatever music you prefer, and act as your personal concierge, answering questions about the hotel and the area. You also can use the iPad to sign in to your existing streaming media accounts for movies and music.

The hotel intends to refine voice activation while measuring guest response. If people use the system and give positive feedback, the chain will roll it out to other properties in the system that choose to opt in.

Previously Aloft has introduced smartphone-controlled room locks, emoji-only room service menus, and, at the Cupertino and Silicon Valley Aloft hotels, a robotic butler called Botlr.

“We think of the Aloft group as our innovation lab for the entire Starwood group,” said Aloft’s VP of global guest initiatives Sarah Downing. “Aloft guests are interested in new things and are eager to give their feedback when we try out something new. Initiatives then trickle down to all the other hotels.”