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Vintage car group says EV classics aren’t real classics. Here’s why that’s wrong

The Fédération Internationale des Véhicules Anciens (FIVA) has put out a statement that explains how the historic vehicle federation does not recognize a vehicle as historic if it has been upgraded to an electric drivetrain. According to the statement, the group “cannot promote, to owners or regulators, the use of modern EV components to replace a historic vehicle’s drivetrain.”

This announcement comes on the heels of several debuts of classic-bodied vehicles with modern electric drivetrains, including those from Lunaz and Swindon Powertrain, as well as factory-backed efforts by Jaguar, Aston Martin, and Volkswagen. FIVA says it sees the need for such modifications, but suggests that modified vehicles remain capable of being returned to factory original specification.

A historic vehicle as defined by FIVA as one that is a minimum of 30 years old, preserved and maintained in a historically correct condition, not used as a means of daily transport, and that is part of our technical and cultural heritage.

Lunaz has issued a response to the FIVA statement, stating that, “as an industry and as a collective, we must respond to a changing world,” and adding that “offering an electric powertrain solution to those that desire it will ensure the cars we love remain a relevant and present proposition for many years to come.”

Introducing new technology such as electric motors will keep these beautiful, classic vehicles on the road for years to come in an environmentally responsible way. The war will wage on between those that believe the basic outline of the original body is enough to keep a classic designation and those that believe the whole vehicle, as engineered, powered and wired, should be considered. As the older car owners age out of operating a vehicle, younger owners are going to step up and want the shape, but maybe are not nostalgic about the antiquated drive systems, low horsepower, and high emissions that goes with them.

What is old can be new again, and today’s technology can open up a whole new window into our past without changing the silhouette of any classically designed masterpiece of the highway. Maybe FIVA should be more concerned about that rather than with pushrod engines with historically bad electrical systems.

These classic cars marry timeless style with modern electric power

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