Skip to main content

A giant of the tech world passed away last night

intel andrew grove 1936 2016 news
Intel
Bill Gates called him “one of the great business leaders.” Tim Cook called him “a giant of the tech world.” Yet to many ordinary PC users he was more or less unknown — even though he helped build the PC industry as we know it today.

Andrew Grove, Intel’s former CEO and board chairman, passed away Monday at the age of 79. Grove was the first hire at Intel and helped steer the company from making memory chips to its current position as the world’s largest manufacturer of semiconductors.

“We are deeply saddened by the passing of former Intel Chairman and CEO Andy Grove,” said Intel CEO Brian Krzanich. “Andy made the impossible happen, time and again, and inspired generations of technologists, entrepreneurs, and business leaders.”

Born in Budapest, Hungary, Grove arrived in the U.S. in 1956, having survived Nazi and Soviet occupation. He studied chemical engineering at the City College of New York and completed his PhD at the University of California in Berkeley in 1963. His working life started at Fairchild Semiconductor, where he was hired by Gordon Moore. He rose to assistant head of R&D at Fairchild, and when Moore left to found Intel, Grove was persuaded to join him.

Grove joined Intel in 1968 as director of engineering and went on to serve as president in 1979 and then CEO in 1987. He built a reputation as an effective leader who could be very demanding, but he clearly had a profound impact on the world of tech. His leadership saw Intel produce the 386 and Pentium, ushering in the PC era. Under his leadership, the company increased its annual revenue from $1.9 billion to more than $26 billion. He stepped down as CEO when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, but he didn’t retire. Between 1997 and 2005 he served as chairman of the board.

“Andy approached corporate strategy and leadership in ways that continue to influence prominent thinkers and companies around the world,” said Intel Chairman Andy Bryant. “He combined the analytic approach of a scientist with an ability to engage others in honest and deep conversation, which sustained Intel’s success over a period that saw the rise of the personal computer, the Internet, and Silicon Valley.”

The tech world was quick to pay tribute to Grove.

The cause of death has not been reported, but Groves had been suffering from Parkinson’s disease for a number of years. He had contributed philanthropically to research to study the disease. He also donated $26 million to the City College of New York to establish the Grove School of Engineering.

He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Eva, two daughters, and eight grandchildren.

Simon Hill
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Simon Hill is an experienced technology journalist and editor who loves all things tech. He is currently the Associate Mobile…
Get this HP 17-inch laptop for $300 instead of the usual $660
The HP 17-inch laptop against a white background.

Seventeen-inch laptops toe the line between portability and size, making them more expensive than your average laptop. Some of the best 17-inch laptops can easily cost you thousands of dollars. Luckily, there HP has come up with a very budget-friendly solution in the form of the HP laptop 17z, and while it's not one of the best laptops on the market, it is an excellent budget-oriented choice for a 17-inch laptop. Even better, HP currently discounts it down to $300 from the usual $560 price tag, which is a significant $260 off.

Why you should buy the HP Laptop 17z
As the name implies, the HP Laptop 17z has a large 17.3-inch screen running a 1920 x 1080 resolution and can hit a peak brightness of 250nits, which isn't a lot, but it's good enough for a well-lit room, especially with its anti-glare coating. You could potentially upgrade to a touch version of the screen for $30, but since it would knock the resolution down to 1600 x 900, it's not worth it, especially with a larger 17.3-inch screen. What will be worth the upgrade is taking the networking option from the Wi-Fi5 and Bluetooth 4.2 standard up to the Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth 5 standard for an extra $20, which will make sure your laptop has a strong connection for streaming or doing online meetings and will be future-proof for at least the next 5-6 years.

Read more
Get a lifetime of 1TB cloud storage for $160
Using Koofr cloud storage on a phone.

One thing about most of the best cloud storage services that you're sure not to like is having to pay for them. Again and again, month after month, they ask for money to continue holding your files. It makes sense, in a way, as their servers take constant real estate and electricity to maintain. Now, though, you can get a lifetime of terabyte cloud storage on Koofr for just $160. The usual price would be $810, so this saves you $650 in total. And, naturally, Koofr's cloud storage has special features that you'll want to know about, too. So, go ahead and tap the button below to find the deal — it'll only be going on for a limited amount of time — and continue reading to see why we like this deal and what makes Koofr special.

Why you should buy cloud storage on Koofr
While Koofr is an advanced cloud storage system, with advanced file management and accessibility from nearly all of your devices, there are two primary reasons to purchase this deal: Security and value.

Read more
The 5 best things you can do with Copilot Pro right now
Microsoft Copilot Pro.

Copilot Pro is Microsoft’s AI subscription service that costs $20 per month for individuals and is integrated into the brand’s Microsoft 365 suite. The paid service offers unique features to Microsoft users, provides faster and more consistent AI performance with priority access to the GPT-4 and GPT-4 Turbo large language models (LLM) during peak times, and also brings the AI technology to the brand’s most popular PC applications -- and that's where things get really interesting.

Here are some of the best features on Copilot Pro and how they work.
Create custom GPTs

Read more