Leaked Intel processor roadmap reveals ‘Cannon Lake’ firing in late 2017

Mobileye
Shutterstock
Several slides supposedly yanked from Intel’s processor roadmap plans have surfaced, revealing the launch windows of the company’s next products during the 2017 and 2018 timeframe.

Intel’s latest generation of processors is codenamed as “Kaby Lake,” and they’re rolling out to the market now as the 7th-generation Core processor. Following Kaby Lake will be “Cannon Lake” along with “Coffee Lake,” the latter of which will offer a six-core chip along with two-core and four-core models.

According to the first leaked roadmap, Cannon Lake will be based on Intel’s first-generation 10-nanometer production technology. These processors will sport two cores and GT2 graphics, and will continue the company’s “U” and “Y” processor lines. The “U” models will have a power requirement of 15 watts whereas the “Y” models will only have a requirement of 4.5 watts. Cannon Lake won’t make an appearance until late next year, and will continue on into 2018.

As for Coffee Lake, the processors will target 2018 spanning “H” and “U” models. The “H” versions will draw between 35 to 45 watts of power whereas the “U” models will draw between 15 and 28 watts of power. Likewise, it’s the former “H” line that will sport the six-core variant along with four-core and two-core chips. The “U” models will only have two cores while all Coffee Lake chips will include Intel’s GT3e graphics.

In a second slide showing Intel’s notebook processor roadmap, the six-core Coffee Lake “H” processor with a 45-watt power envelope and GT2 graphics is slated to arrive sometime during the second quarter of 2018. This chip will be joined by four-core “U” processors with power envelopes of 15 watts and 28 watts, and GT3e graphics.

The roadmap leak indicates Intel might add six-core chips to its mobile line-up.

The six-core chip is potentially the most interesting. Up until now, Intel’s “H” line processors have typically been the “HQ” series of Core i5 and Core i7 mobile quad-core hardware. The roadmap leak indicates the possibility of Intel adding six-core chips to its mainstream mobile line-up for the first time.

That’s assuming Intel’s future branding is the same as its current, however. As Intel recently demonstrated with Core M, its strategy isn’t set in stone. Its possible the six-core chips will only be for Xeon mobile, or target small desktops and all-in-ones.

Before that, Intel plans to flood the notebook market with its Cannon Lake processors in Q4 2017. A 15-watt model with GT2 graphics will fill the “U” line while a 5.2-watt model with GT2 graphics will fall under the “Y” processor umbrella. These will essentially replace Kaby Lake.

Intel’s second slide also reveals the launch window of its “Gemini Lake” processor. Right now, we’re just now seeing the rollout of Intel’s “Apollo Lake” processors with four cores and power envelopes of four watts and six watts. These will continue to cover Intel’s “N” processor line until Q4 2017 when Gemini Lake makes its debut. Gemini Lake will also consist of quad-core processors with four watt and six watt power envelopes.

Keep in mind that everything mentioned here regarding Intel’s roadmap falls under “rumor” given that the company hasn’t officially laid out its roadmap for all to see. And as one of the slides points out, all dates and plans are subject to change without notice.

Computing

Intel’s 2019 NUC may get even more powerful, thanks to 9th-Gen Core i9 processor

Intel may be looking at adding even more performance to its compact desktop range. The company's 2019 line of NUC PCs could be refreshed with the latest 9th-Generation processor, which packs in eight cores and 16 threads.
Computing

Ryzen 3000 CPUs could be the most powerful ever. Here's what we know

AMD's upcoming Ryzen 3000 generation of CPUs could be the most powerful processors we've ever seen, with higher core counts, greater clock speeds, and competitive pricing. Here's what we know so far.
Computing

Intel's 9th-gen chips could power your next rig. Here's what you need to know

The Intel Core i9-9900K processor was the star of the show for consumers, but a powerful 28-core Xeon processor also led announcements. Here's everything you need to know about the latest Intel chipsets.
Computing

Microsoft’s Chromium Edge browser may be adding your Chrome extensions

Fans sticking to Google Chrome because due to its vast extension library might be able to switch over to Microsoft's latest iteration of Edge, as a project manager confirms that the company has its eyes on Chrome extensions.
Gaming

Apple Mac users should take a bite out of these awesome games

Contrary to popular belief, there exists a bevy of popular A-list games compatible for Mac computers. Take a look at our picks for the best Mac games available for Apple fans.
Emerging Tech

An A.I. cracks the internet’s squiggly letter bot test in 0.5 seconds

How do you prove that you’re a human when communicating on the internet? The answer used to be by solving a CAPTCHA puzzle. But maybe not for too much longer. Here is the reason why.
Computing

Qualcomm’s dual-screen PC concept looks like two connected Surface Go tablets

In Qualcomm's video teaser, we got a glimpse of the company's vision for how a dual-screen ARM PC should work. The internet reacted to Qualcomm's video, calling the device in question merely a mashup of two Surface Go tablets.
Deals

Check out the best Green Monday deals for those last-minute gifts

Black Friday and Cyber Monday have come and gone, but that doesn't mean you've missed your chance of finding a great deal. We're talking about Green Monday, of course, and it falls on December 10.
Computing

Hololens 2 could give the Always Connected PC a new, ‘aggressive’ form

Microsoft is said to be leaning on Qualcomm to power its Hololens 2 headset. Instead of Intel CPUs, the next Hololens could use a Snapdragon 850 processor, allowing it to benefit from the always-connected features.
Computing

Chrome’s dark mode may cast its shadow over Macs by early 2019

By early 2019 Google may release a version of Chrome for Mac users that offers a Dark Mode feature to match MacOS Mojave's recent darkening.
Computing

These laptop bags will keep your notebook secure wherever you go

Choosing the right laptop bag is no easy feat -- after all, no one likes to second-guess themselves. Here are some of the best laptop bags on the market, from backpacks to sleeves, so you can get it right the first time around.
Home Theater

Step aside set-top boxes, the best streaming sticks are tiny and just as powerful

Which streaming stick reigns supreme? We pit the Chromecast and Chromecast Ultra against the Roku Premiere, Roku Streaming Stick+, and the Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K to help you decide which one will be the best fit in your living room.
Computing

If you've lost a software key, these handy tools can find it for you

Missing product keys getting you down? We've chosen some of the best software license and product key finders in existence, so you can locate and document your precious keys on your Windows or MacOS machine.
Computing

Google+ continues to sink with a second massive data breach. Abandon ship now

Google+ was scheduled to shut its doors in August 2019, but the second security breach in only a few months has caused the company to move its plan forward a few months. It might be a good idea to delete your account sooner than later.