Microsoft relaunches the classic mouse that changed gaming forever

When it debuted in 1996, the original Microsoft IntelliMouse was nothing short of revolutionary. Gamers in particular loved it because of its ergonomic design, responsive buttons, and the introduction of the scroll wheel.

Although today’s gaming mice tend to feature industrial designs, garish colors, and multiple programmable buttons, the latest IntelliMouse promises a new generation of the same features that made it so popular when it debuted.

The last iteration of this classic peripheral was the IntelliMouse 3.0 back in 2003. “We’ve reached a point where tracking and switch technology and price has matured immensely,” said Simon Dearsley, a design director at Microsoft, in a Q&A blog post announcing the new mouse. “We saw this as an opportunity to improve on an icon by updating it with modern technology.”

Only a wired version is available, which reduces latency in gaming, and the red “taillight” has been replaced with a softer white light. According to PC World, its specs are comparable to the Microsoft Surface Precision Mouse, with a BlueTrack sensor that registers movements 1,000 times per second and a dpi setting up to 3,200.

The mouse features five buttons, three of which are programmable. “We were really careful to keep the same Omron switches for the left and right click, and have added three Kailh switches for the middle wheel button and side buttons,” said Dearsley. “We also made a huge improvement to the two side buttons. They now feel snappy and crisp and have just the right force and click to them.”

Although it’s designed to operate with everything since Windows 7, it doesn’t work with Mac OS, because it’s not compatible with the button configuration options in the Mouse and Keyboard Center software.

The announcement video features a clever Rube Goldberg contraption that traces its gaming lineage back to classics like Minesweeper and Microsoft Flight Simulator.

There’s no southpaw version and no wireless option, but the $40 price is sure to be attractive to fans of the retro styling. “I would say it’s the shape and the form,” said Dearsley. “The shape was originally sculptured by hand by some of the most experienced mouse designers in the world, which has proven to last the test of time.”

Computing

Still miss Windows 7? Here's how to make Windows 10 look more like it

There's no simple way of switching on a Windows 7 mode in Windows 10. Instead, you can install third-party software, manually tweak settings, and edit the registry. We provide instructions for using these tweaks and tools.
Gaming

One game console is better than the rest, and we're not afraid to say it

We've seen a relatively large influx of new consoles in the last year, including the Nintendo Switch and Xbox One X, so we've updated our recommendations for the best dedicated game hardware.
Gaming

If we get a Nintendo 64 Classic, it needs to have these games

The Nintendo 64 introduced a long list of top-tier games, but which were the iconic platform's best? From Mario Party to Ocarina of Time to NFL Blitz, check out our picks for the best N64 games.
Gaming

Who needs a Switch? These 25 games prove there's fun to be found on 3DS

The 3DS is home to a large library, including some of the greatest games Nintendo has ever published. We've compiled this list of some of the best Nintendo 3DS games currently available.
Computing

Stop your PC's vow of silence with these tips on how to fix audio problems

Sound problems got you down? Don't worry, with a few tweaks and tricks we'll get your sound card functioning as it should, and you listening to your favorite tunes and in-game audio in no time.
Computing

Yes, Android apps can run on your PC, and it's easier than you think

Wish you knew how to run Android apps in Windows? It's easier than you might think and there are a number of different ways to do it. In this guide, we break down the steps so you can follow along with ease.
Computing

Chip off the auction block – Intel’s i9-9990XE may be sold to the highest bidder

Intel's alleged Core i9-9990XE may only be sold at auction to OEMs, meaning that only a few of the 14-core, 28-thread, 5GHz CPUs will ever see the light of day in specific devices and systems.
Computing

Don't spend hundreds on Pro Tools or Logic. Try one of these free alternatives

Believe it or not, Pro Tools isn't the only digital audio workstation worth your time. Check out our picks for the best free recording software, whether you're looking for a lightweight app or a full-blown audio workstation.
Computing

How to share an external hard drive between Mac and Windows

Compatibility issues between Microsoft Windows and Apple MacOS may have diminished sharply over the years, but that doesn't mean they've completely disappeared. Here's how to make an external drive work between both operating systems.
Computing

Should you buy the affordable MacBook Air, or is the MacBook Pro worth the price?

Though they both share Retina Displays and similar keyboards, there are still some specs differences and other changes that differentiate the new 2018 MacBook Air and MacBook Pro. In this guide, we stack the two up against each other.
Android

Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2019: Complete Coverage

There's no bigger show for mobile tech geeks than Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain: where flagship phones are born and intriguing new wearables shine. And this year, where foldable phones and 5G are likely to dominate the news. For…
Computing

Google is giving its G Suite web apps new touches of visual improvements

Your G Suite applications will soon have a different look. Several of the web apps are getting updated with subtle visual improvements inspired by Google's Material Design guidelines. 
Emerging Tech

CES 2019 recap: All the trends, products, and gadgets you missed

CES 2019 didn’t just give us a taste of the future, it offered a five-course meal. From 8K and Micro LED televisions to smart toilets, the show delivered with all the amazing gadgetry you could ask for. Here’s a look at all the big…
Computing

Hackers are scoring with ransomware that attacks its previous victims

Computer viruses are always evolving. In a new one, dubbed "Ryuk," hackers are targeting PCs with ransomware that scours an infected network in order to pinpoint and attack and enterprises with big money.