Nvidia may have finally solved bug on high refresh monitors

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Robert Freiberger/Flickr
Rejoice Counter-Strike players, a new update suggest that Nvidia has solved a bug that’s been affecting high refresh G-Sync monitors.

For months, Nvidia users have been complaining of a bug that, on high refresh monitors incorporating G-sync, has caused increased power draw even on idling systems.

Related: Testing shows Nvidia’s new video cards still go nuts with multiple high-refresh monitors

Earlier it was thought that Nvidia had solved the issue with its 361.43 update, and for all intents and purposes it did. But the issue came back up for users with multiple high refresh rate monitors with G-Sync. Even with the release of Nvidia’s recent 1000 series Pascal based graphics cards, the same bug reappeared. On systems using an 980ti, users noticed that with one monitor connected to the GPU, the card would idle at 135MHz. When a second monitor would be plugged it, the system shot up to 925MHz.

While an increase in wattage won’t be detrimental to your system, it does put more strain on it and, of course, eats at your electric bill. Also, listening to GPU fans roar while browsing the internet would cause some concerns.

Luckily with update 372.54, things should be resolved. The driver release states that it “enabled mclk switches on 144 Hz G-SYNC monitors in multi-monitor use cases in order to lower power consumption.” Tech Report took the time to test the new driver, and it’s currently looking like things are working as they should.

In recent years, high refresh rate monitors with G-Sync have become a popular draw for many gamers. While still expensive, they give a far smoother experience, one that makes for a better gaming experience, especially for titles that require fast reflexes. And with the growth in popularity of esports, or competitive video gaming, manufacturers like BenQ and Asus are promoting these displays heavily and often.

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