LED indoor farms could change the food industry, and help solve world hunger

The world’s population keeps growing and we keep using up the Earth’s land to grow more food – so what happens when traditional agriculture can no longer meet the demands of all those hungry bellies?

According to Philips, the answer may be indoor farms that grow plants with LEDs. The company has recently opened its GrowWise City indoor farm in the Netherlands, and the facility has the potential to revolutionize the way we cultivate food, and maybe even solve world hunger issues

At the LED-powered, 2,500-square-foot facility, Philips’ scientists are working to create “LED light growth recipes” for producers, so that future farmers will be able to grow healthy and fresh crops all year long — without any soil or sunlight.

GrowWise City is a clean environment that allows for absolutely no natural light or air. Instead, the farm employs a connected, customizable LED system that provides specialized lighting sequences that target each plant’s ideal growth requirements — creating veggies and other fresh produce that’s completely organic and free of pesticides.

The research center is comprised of four-layered mechanized planting racks in eight climate rooms. Each of the planting rack’s layers uses Philips GreenPower LEDs that specialize specifically in crop-growth, and can be tweaked to suit individual plants. Right now, Philips researchers are focusing on light recipes for upgraded leafy vegetables, strawberries and herbs, and they’ll soon move on to grow better carbohydrate crops like wheat and potatoes.

“Our aim is to develop the technology that makes it possible to grow tasty, healthy and sustainable food virtually anywhere. The research we are undertaking will enable local food production on a global scale, reducing waste, limiting food miles and using practically no land or water,” said Gus van der Feltz, Philips Global Director of City Farming, in a press release.

But like we mentioned earlier, it’s not all about healthier, better-tasting food – Philips is addressing societal concerns like world hunger, and looking for a more feasible way to grow food when resources are depleted in the future. The company’s ultimate goal is to improve the technology so that year-round indoor farming becomes more feasible, and can be adopted in crowded cities that don’t have lots of water, energy or land to work with.

The Netherlands facility is up and running and is now home to 10,000 researchers who are working hard in GrowWise City’s technology hub to create better food for everyone.

Emerging Tech

Ford’s bipedal delivery robot can walk straight up to your doorstep

Autonomous wheeled delivery robots are seemingly everywhere in 2019. Agility Robotics' Digit robot takes a different approach: It promises to carry out its deliveries while walking on two legs.
Gaming

Apple Mac users should take a bite out of these awesome games

Contrary to popular belief, there exists a bevy of popular A-list games compatible for Mac computers. Take a look at our picks for the best Mac games available for Apple fans to enjoy.
Movies & TV

Prime-time TV: Here are the best shows on Amazon Prime right now

There's more to Amazon Prime than free two-day shipping, including access to a number of phenomenal shows at no extra cost. To make the sifting easier, here are our favorite shows currently streaming on Amazon Prime.
Emerging Tech

Two galaxies play tug of war in this spectacular Hubble image

Hubble has captured evidence of a nearby galactic neighbor affecting the the shape and star production of a galaxy. The irregular galaxy NGC 4485 has been pulled into an unusual shape due to the nearby and much larger galaxy NGC 4490.
Smart Home

Walmart vs. Amazon: Which has better prices, shipping, and customer service?

Both Walmart and Amazon have their good points and bad, and we compare the two online retailers side-by-side. Where's the better place to shop online, Amazon or Walmart? Let's find out.
Emerging Tech

This guy managed to squeeze an entire game console into a Game Boy cartridge

Popular YouTuber 3DSage has managed to compress an entire mobile games console inside a single original Game Boy cartridge. Check it out in all in its impressively miniaturized glory.
Emerging Tech

I mainlined a bag of liquid vitamins — for science

Healthy people are signing up for treatments that are typically saved for patients stuck in hospital beds. Known as nutrient IV therapy, the treatment entails pumping vitamins, minerals, and fluids directly into the bloodstream, bypassing…
Emerging Tech

Scientists use an X-ray laser to create the loudest possible underwater sound

Researchers from Stanford University and the Department of Energy have produced the loudest sound possible to make under water. Here's how they managed to create it — and why they did it.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Huawei updates, Starlink launch, and Pac-Man’s birthday

On this episode of DT Live, we discuss the ongoing Huawei saga, Amazon’s social games for workers, Ford's partnership with a robotics company, the Starlink satellite launch, Pac-Man’s birthday, and more.
Emerging Tech

Las Vegas officials bet big on Elon Musk’s Boring Company

Elon Musk’s Boring Company has just been awarded a $48.6 million contract by Las Vegas to build a high-speed transportation system beneath the city’s enormous convention center, and it could be ready by early 2020.
Emerging Tech

Airbus shows off the futuristic interior of its autonomous flying taxi

Airbus has given us the first look inside its single-seat flying taxi. The absence of controls in the Vahana electric aircraft is a reflection of its autonomous capabilities, so you can just sit back and enjoy the ride.
Emerging Tech

Future smart clothes promise to keep you the perfect temperature at all times

Regulating your body temperature can sometimes be tough. Engineers from UC San Diego have developed heating and cooling wearable tech which could be embedded into future smart clothing.
Emerging Tech

Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa 2 aborts marker drop mission

The Hayabusa 2 spacecraft's mission to drop a reflective marker on the surface of asteroid Ryugu has been aborted. The Japanese team was considering a second touchdown on the asteroid to collect more materials, but this now seems unlikely.
Emerging Tech

Whose name should we etch on the Mars 2020 rover? NASA wants a vote

Dream of making it to Mars? NASA has opened up a new public outreach program to let people send their names to the Red Planet, as an engraving on a silicon chip launched with the Mars 2020 rover.