Flic is a smart, wireless button that lets you play music, make calls, order pizza

Flic smart button
Apparently tapping screens of various sorts and sizes is becoming too arduous for the human race, so we need to revert to tactile buttons to make it even easier to accomplish everyday tasks. That’s the proposition of the Flic, a smart button that can be set up to do just about anything (within reason) you want to do on a day-to-day basis – from snapping photos, to making calls, to playing music, to snoozing your alarm, and beyond.

At first glance, the Flic is a soft, pleasant-looking button that sticks to various surfaces. However, once a user sets up functions for their Flic via the accompanying app, the true power of the smart button shines through. Each Flic can execute three actions – one by clicking, another by double-clicking and yet another by holding.

There are many potential use cases for the Flic – for instance, it can be used to control smart features in your home (e.g., lighting, device power, unlocking doors), help you find a misplaced phone or use speed dial to contact a family member (or your favorite pizza joint).

 

 
The smart button uses Bluetooth Low Energy to connect to an iPhone (4S and later), iPad (third generation and later) or Android device (4.3 and later), and works up to 150 feet away from its paired device. One Flic button can last up to 60,000 clicks or about five years, according to the Swedish team behind the device. It uses standard button cells, which can be replaced.

The Flic, which is smaller than a quarter, is housed in a silicon mold and can withstand outdoor environments and dust. It also comes with a reusable double-sided adhesive, which can be cleaned whenever it gets dirty.

The button will retail for about $35, though backers of the crowdfunding campaign can get some at a discount. There’s also a $10 Flic Clip, which turns the smart button into a wearable device.

The Flic’s Indiegogo campaign, which closes on Jan. 3, has raised more than $420,000, catapulting past its original $80,000 goal. Shipments are scheduled to begin in March.

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