Grace Digital Audio’s tabletop Internet radio sports Pandora controls

Folks addicted to the customized music streams provided by Pandora have long since gotten used to pulling in their stations on a wide range of devices, from desktop computers and notebooks to mobile phones, gaming consoles, televisions, and home stereos. But sometimes a simple tabletop radio is the perfect solution for a space, and Grace Digital Audio is solving the Pandora problem there with its Wi-Fi Internet Radio featuring Pandora. Wi-Fi tabletop radios aren’t anything new…but Grace Audio’s solution is the first to feature dedicated controls for Pandora stations.

grace digital audios tabletop internet radio sports pandora controls audio gdi ir2550p  oct 2010

“In the transition of bringing Pandora radio from the computer to the tabletop, most Internet radios lose the simple functions that the computer provided,” said Grace Digital CMO Greg Fadul, in a statement. “We’ve created a stylish Wi-Fi enabled tabletop radio with high-grade audio that reflects the same simple and easy-to-use functions of Pandora that are available on the computer.”

Along with a remote control and the ability to tap into more than 50,000 online radio stations—including services like NPR, Fox News, BBC, NOAA weather reports, and CNN—the Wi-Fi Internet radio features dedicated thumbs-up and thumbs-down buttons for rating songs, along with play/pause functionality and the ability to bookmark songs using either the remote or the radio’s front panel. Users can also control the device using a free iPhone remote control app.

The radio itself features a four-line backlit display, 10 station presets (and a 99 station “folder”), a 802.11g Wi-Fi connectivity, built-in clock and alarm (with up to 5 alarm settings), and a 3.5mm headphone jack for quiet listening. In addition to Pandora, the radio supports services like Live365 and Sirius Premium Internet Radio, and can handle a wide variety of audio formats, including AIFF, AIFC, WAVE, CAF, NeXT, ADTS, MP3, AAC, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, and WMA. The radio can also stream music directly from a PC or Mac on the local network.

The Wi-Fi Internet Radio featuring Pandora (model GDI-IR2550p) is available now for a suggested price of $169.99.

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