Lofree Four Seasons is a mechanical keyboard for the 21st century

Lofree
Modern technology just a bit too … modern for you? If the design aesthetic of the 21st century has you longing for something a bit more retro, there may be a solution. Meet the Lofree, a nostalgic yet decidedly new-age keyboard that combines elements of the past with today’s innovations and advances. Heralded as “the first mechanical keyboard inspired by typewriters,” the Lofree is an elegant take on a generation past.

Following a successful initial Indiegogo campaign that raised over $700,000, Lofree is now back with its second-generation keyboard. Called the Four Seasons, the new keyboard features four new sets of mixed-color keycaps to bring some whimsy into your typography, as well as a few adjustments to key positions that claim to make typing a bit easier. For example, the backspace and caps lock buttons have been enlarged, and the 1 button has been moved to the upper left hand side of the Q key to more closely mimic an Apple keyboard.

Designed with Mac users in mind, the Lofree keyboard has the exact layout as that of an Apple device. This sets it apart from the vast majority of other wireless keyboards on the market, which generally adopt PC designs. But while it’s all about modern technology, it has quite a bit of nostalgic charm. Its round keycaps that give the keyboard a vintage, classic look. They even feel and sound like typewriting keys, but you won’t have to worry about them getting stuck all the time.

The compact keyboard can be used in wireless or wired mode (so you can pair it with just about any device you want), and is compatible with most operating systems — Windows, Mac, Android, and iOS. So if you want to pair the Lofree with a tablet, be it an iPad or an Android, have at it. In fact, you can pair the Lofree with up to three devices simultaneously, so you’re not spending all your time configuring and reconfiguring just to send an email. And with three different backlit settings, you’ll always be able to set the right mood with this keyboard.

With a month left in its new campaign, the Lofree has already raised over $43,000. You can pre-order one now for $74, and select from four unique color schemes. Delivery is anticipated for March 2018.

Update: Lofree introduces its second-generation Four Seasons keyboard. 

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