Porsche Design now makes… hookahs?

porsche-shisha-water-pipe

Everyone knows Porsche for their stylish, super-fast cars. What most likely do not know is that the company’s accessory subsidiary, Porsche Design Group, now makes high-end smoking paraphernalia.

Dubbed the “Shisha,” this sleek water pipe has all the fine detail and elegant curves of a sports car, but with a unique functionality that makes this Porsche product special: the ability to smoke marijuana out of it. (Though that’s not the recommended usage, of course.) Try doing that with your 911 Turbo!

Understandably, the Shisha is officially not a “bong,” since that might ruffle a few feathers. But we all know the truth. To help disguise this obvious fact, Porsche describes the Shisha more like a watch than something that you smoke stuff out of.

“The extraordinary Porsche Design Shisha combines high-quality materials such as aluminum, stainless steel and glass with the timeless and unique design approach of the luxury brand,” the press release says. “Puristic and stylish at the same time.”

The Shisha stands almost 2 feet tall (55 cm), and is made of glass and aluminum. For buyers who don’t want to flaunt the exclusive Porsche branding to their less-well-off friends, the designers graciously included only one logo on the Shisha, which is discretely located near the top of the piece. The Shisha also features a “long flexible tube” made from Porsche’s custom TecFlex material, which is also used to make Porsche Design pens.

In addition to the Shisha, Porsche Design is also releasing a series of other “exclusively designed products,” including “chopsticks, a tea and soup set as well as a few fashion items such as a jacket, polo shirt and a silk scarf.”

On the more tech side of things, Porsche also recently announced two types of external hard drives: the LaCie Porsche Design Mobile P’9220, which comes in 500GB and 1TB storage sizes, as well as a 750GB size that’s only available at Porsche stores; and the LaCie Porsche Design Desktop Hard Drive P’9230, which is available in 1TB and 2TB sizes.

UPDATE: The headline of this article was changed at 12:20pm EST.

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