Weed, booze, guns. This vending machine can sell just about anything

What if sandwiched between the Cheetos and gum the next time you walked up to a vending machine you also had the option of buying marijuana, a beer, or a handgun?  Well, that is a real possibility thanks to a so-called “smart vending machine” developed by American Green, a Phoenix-based company working on technological advancements in the legal cannabis industry.

Yes, weed is why the company decided the world needs this vending machine — but the machine itself is designed to sell just about anything that you’d otherwise have to buy from a human who can verify you’re of a certain age, have a necessary prescription, or have a clean enough history to purchase a firearm.

How? Well, for starters, you’ll have to register online with an official ID so that American Green knows who you say you are.  You then couple your profile with your vein architecture.  A biometric vein scanner on the front seems like it takes your fingerprint, but developers insist vein architecture, as in how the veins are stacked, shaped, and run through your finger, is an equally unique attribute. Plus, unlike a fingerprint, which can be spoofed in a few ways, vein scanners are harder to cheat, and wont work if someone decides they’re willing to cut your finger off to get your share of weed or alcohol or whatever.

American Green says it’s just producing the vending machines, and that it’s up to the actual vendors to determine what goes inside and fight whatever legal battles come with, say, putting an unmanned box full of guns on the street. Creators say, though, that with its sturdy construction, extra layers of metal, a camera up front, and an alarm that’s trigger the second someone starts messing with it; this vending machine is at least as safe as a convenience store — if not more.

The company insists you’ll start seeing these out in the wild in as soon as a couple months as it finalizes talks with some casinos, professional sports teams, and marijuana dispensaries.

Cars

Can electric motors finally make three-wheeled cars great?

Every few years, someone tries to sell a three-wheeled vehicle to Americans. Historically, it hasn’t gone very well. We’ve got our suspicions about why people don’t buy trikes, and they boil down to this: a trike is just not a real…
Mobile

Do these case images confirm a side-mounted fingerprint scanner on the S10 E?

It won't be long now; With 2019 underway, the Samsung Galaxy S10 is almost here. Before it arrives, here's absolutely everything you need to know about all three of Samsung's next flagships.
Web

Switch up your Reddit routine with these interesting, inspiring, and zany subs

So you've just joined the wonderful world of Reddit and want to explore it. With so many subreddits, however, navigating the "front page of the internet" can be daunting. Here are some of the best subreddits to get you started.
Health & Fitness

In search of the fountain of youth, beauty companies turn to tech

Beauty tech is a fairly new concept, but at CES 2019, companies such as Olay, L’Oreal, and Neutrogena were fully embracing it with all kinds of gadgets that promise to give you glowing skin.
Emerging Tech

Tiny microbots fold like origami to travel through the human body

Tiny robots modeled after bacteria could be used to deliver drugs to hard to reach areas of the human body. Scientists have developed elastic microbots that can change their shape depending on their environment.
Emerging Tech

Dinosaurs never stood a chance after asteroid impacts doubled 290M years ago

The number of asteroids pummeling Earth jumped dramatically around 290 million years ago. By looking at Moon craters, scientists discovered that d the number of asteroid impacts on both Earth and the Moon increased by two to three times.
Emerging Tech

Saturn didn’t always have rings, according to new analysis of Cassini data

Saturn's rings are younger than previously believed, according to new data gathered from the Cassini mission. The rings are certainly less than 100 million years old and perhaps as young as 10 million years old.
Emerging Tech

Water-based fuel cell converts carbon emissions to electricity

Scientists from Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology have developed a system which can continuously produce electrical energy and hydrogen by dissolving carbon dioxide in an aqueous solution.
Emerging Tech

Scientists investigate how massive stars die in dramatic hypernova events

Our Sun will gradually fade before expanding into a red giant at the end of its life. But larger mass stars undergo extreme explosive events called hypernovas when they die which outshine their entire galaxies.
Emerging Tech

Pilotless planes are on their way, but would you fly in one?

Airbus says advancements in artificial intelligence can help it toward its goal of building a plane capable of fully autonomous flight, though whether passengers can be persuaded to travel in one is another matter entirely.
Emerging Tech

‘Tech vest’ prevents Amazon workers from colliding with robot co-workers

Amazon workers at its fulfillment centers are using "tech vests" to help protect them from collisions with their robot co-workers. The robots already have obstacle avoidance sensors, but the belt offers another layer of safety.
Emerging Tech

3D printers are finally affordable. Here are the best models under $500

3D printer prices have dropped dramatically over the past few years, but just because something is cheap doesn’t mean it’s worth buying. Here, we’ve rounded up all the cheap 3D printers that are actually worth spending your money on.
Mobile

T-Mobile 5G rollout: Here is everything you need to know

2019 will be a huge year for T-Mobile. Not only is a merger with Sprint likely, but T-Mobile is also in the midst of building out its next-generation mobile service. Here's everything you need to know about the T-Mobile 5G rollout.
Emerging Tech

ANYmal dog robot can get back on its feet when someone pushes it over

Roboticists at ETH Zurich have demonstrated how their ANYmal four-legged robot is capable of taking a kicking and keeping on walking -- or getting back to its feet if it's pushed over.