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iCloud doesn’t encrypt your data, but these cloud storage apps do

By now, it’s well-known that Apple does not encrypt your iCloud backups, but there’s no need to fret. There are plenty of other ways to accomplish the task of securely backing up your data to the cloud. Several services offer more secure storage with various encryption options. Here are the iOS apps to consider if privacy is your thing.

Tresorit

Tresorit
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Tresorit offers encryption services for business, enterprise, and personal users. Secured with AES 256 end-to-end encryption, your files are safe both on the company’s servers and while in-transit to your device. Tresorit stores your data across multiple Microsoft Azure data centers in the European Union. The company is headquartered in Switzerland, which has stricter privacy laws than most other countries, including the U.S. Tresorit features include document version tracking and the ability to share drive documents securely. Prices range from free to $24 per month.

Mega

MEGA
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Mega provides a secure cloud option featuring browser-based, high-performance, end-to-end encryption. Files are secured with AES 128 encryption, storing your data via a subsidiary of Cogent, a U.S. company with servers in Germany. Mega offers secure sharing of cloud files, an integrated audio/video call feature, public source code for its apps that allows third parties to verify the company’s offerings, and a free tier that includes 50GB of storage. Subscription levels range from $5 to $30 per month.

pCloud

pCloud
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pCloud provides secure cloud storage, while its pCloud Crypto feature lets you create secure folders with AES 256 encryption. For a flat price of $175, you can have 500GB of cloud storage for life or for $350, and you can increase that amount to 2TB. The newest updates let you allow people who can access your folder links to upload files to your account. You can now add password protection to your file or folder links and control expiration dates. You can now also scan documents to directly upload to your account.

Sync.com

Sync
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Sync.com offers a private cloud with secure end-to-end encryption. Some of the features that allow Sync.com to stand out include its enterprise-grade infrastructure with multiple data center locations featuring SAS RAID storage, automatic failover systems, and a rated 99.9% or better uptime. This service also offers HIPAA and other compliance options allowing legal, healthcare, and accounting practices to make use of its offerings. Subscriptions range from $5 to $15 per month, with up to 10TB per user. All options include sharing and collaboration features, real-time backup, and file recovery options.

Cryptomator

Cryptomator
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While not a cloud storage host, Cryptomator keeps your files encrypted on private and public clouds such as Apple’s iCloud. If you’re already a fan of Apple’s services and aren’t looking to move, this software option lets you continue working with your favorite cloud storage provider, including iCloud Drive, Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, and WebDAV-based cloud storage services. Cryptomator encrypts your files before they are uploaded to the cloud.

Boxcryptor

Boxcryptor
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Boxcryptor encrypts files and folders in conjunction with popular storage providers like Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, and others. It lets you encrypt data on your device before syncing it to your service. You get the highest end-to-end encryption standards of AES 256 and RSA 4096, as well as secure file sharing with other Boxcryptor users. The app is free for a single cloud storage provider on two devices. For $48 per year for individuals and $96 per year for businesses, you get unlimited cloud providers, an unlimited number of devices, filename encryption, and email support.

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Michael Archambault
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Michael Archambault is a technology writer and digital marketer located in Long Island, New York. For the past decade…
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