Skip to main content

FedEx mistakenly rejects shipment of a Huawei phone to the U.S.

FedEx Van
Erik Leenaars / Flickr

The trade situation between the U.S. and China is escalating, with Chinese company Huawei recently placed on the U.S. Department of Commerce’s “Entity List” which prevents it from using parts from U.S. companies without permission from the U.S. government. But there has been some confusion about what exactly that means for users of Huawei products who are based in the U.S.

A recent incident involved a tech writer from PCMag who tried to ship a Huawei phone from the U.K. to the U.S. by Parcelforce and then by FedEx. As required, he filled out a form stating the make and model of the phone he was shipping. But he was surprised by the phone did not reach its destination in the U.S., but was instead returned to him in the U.K.

The Entity List should affect companies buying parts on a large scale, not individuals who want to send phones or other technology to private citizens. It should prevent Huawei from receiving parts from U.S. companies, not stop people from shipping their phones. But according to statements given to PCMag, the shipping companies seemed confused about their legal requirements in this situation.

We reached out to FedEx for comment and a representative confirmed that there is not a ban on the shipment of Huawei products, and in this case the returning of the phone was a mistake.

“The package in question was mistakenly returned to the shipper, and we apologize for this operational error,” FedEx said in a statement to Digital Trends. “As a global company that moves 15 million shipments each day, we are committed to compliance with all rules and regulations and minimizing impact to our customers as we adjust our operations to comply with a dynamic U.S. regulatory environment.”

FedEx also reiterated that “FedEx can accept and transport all Huawei products except for any shipments to listed Huawei entities on the U.S. Entity List,” and that in the recent case, “The return to sender label attached to the package in question was not generated by FedEx.”

U.S. technology regulations certainly can be complex, and with the recent addition of Huawei to the Entity List it seems likely that someone at the shipping company misunderstood their legal requirements. But this incident goes to show how private individuals can get caught in the middle when a trade war escalates.

Georgina Torbet
Georgina is the Digital Trends space writer, covering human space exploration, planetary science, and cosmology. She…
I have a new favorite portable battery bank for my kids to steal
The Anker MagGo Power Bank.

I have bought too many portable battery banks over the past few years for one reason, and one reason only: I have teenage daughters. And that’s the thing about having kids — your stuff is going to wander off and disappear into the abyss that is their rooms. It’s an inevitability.

And so in preparing for a summer family excursion, I picked up a new battery bank, because I needed something a little more portable for fun time, so I could leave at home the monster battery I carry with me on work trips.

Read more
I tested iPadOS 18. It’s not the iPad update I was hoping for
home Screen of an iPad Pro that boots iPadOS 18.

I believe I fit into the iPad Pro’s target audience fairly well. I edit videos to make my sibling’s travel clips look nice on social media. Photo manipulation is a part of my daily routine, and I put in roughly 4 to 5 hours each week labeling images of dental scans for a machine learning training and research project.

I push my M4 iPad Pro as far as I can until I reach the frustratingly short limits of its operating system. Ever since Apple dropped the bombshell of a class-leading 3-nanometer processor being put inside its latest flagship tablet, the chatter of iPadOS finally getting a computing-worthy overhaul kicked into an all-time frenzy.

Read more
Don’t forget. You can save big on a replacement Apple Pencil 2 for Prime Day
The 2nd gen Apple Pencil laying on a table.

It's easy to think of Prime Day as the time to pick up new goodies and, from time to time, to check out if that expensive new tech item has dropped down to an affordable price. What we often forget is that Prime Day deals are also a great way to pick up essentials, extras, and replacement items. Right now, this Apple Prime Day deal on the Apple Pencil 2 is a perfect example of that spirit in action. Normally $129, the price has dropped by $50 on the humble Apple Pencil 2, bringing it to $79. Whether you've lost your old one, want a backup, or need a fresh one to go with the iPad Prime Day deal you picked up, now is the time to get an Apple Pencil 2. Tap the button below to pick yours up now, or keep reading to see what makes the Apple Pencil 2 special.

 
Why you should buy the Apple Pencil 2
The number one reason you should buy the Apple Pencil 2 right now is to have a backup or to replace your lost or stolen one while the price is low. But there's always the chance that you haven't had an Apple Pencil 2 before, in which case you should know how it operates. While we'll leave it to our Apple Pencil 2 review to cover the fine details, you should know that the pen detects tilt and pressure as you write. When combined with the low latency of the pen's connection with your tablet, you'll find that writing with it feels very fluid and lifelike. The Apple Pencil 2's convenient wireless charging lets it charge while it is attached to the edge of your iPad, the most likely spot you'd ever want to put it, making having a charged Apple Pencil 2 a thoughtless exercise.

Read more