Xfinity indoor/outdoor camera zooms in on Grinch’s faces and license plates

‘Tis the season’…to have packages stolen from your porch. Unfortunately, there are way too many Grinches waiting to steal home deliveries. A new Xfinity Home security camera feature can capture Grinch faces and license plates and share the footage with police.

UPS estimated it made more than 750 million deliveries between Thanksgiving Day and New Year’s Eve last year. According to a new survey conducted by Wakefield Research for Comcast, nearly one in four people say they have had packages stolen.

Comcast announced that its Xfinity Home indoor/outdoor security cameras use artificial intelligence (A.I.) to zoom in on critical features that can help law enforcement if someone steals from you.

“Home security cameras, when integrated with our other Xfinity services, offer great peace of mind so our customers can check-in on their home from anywhere, anytime,” said Eric Schaefer, Xfinity Services general manager and senior vice president.

“On any given day, our Xfinity cameras can capture many motion-triggered video recordings,” Shaefer continued. “Our engineers used A.I. to create filters for people or vehicles so they can more easily and quickly find the moment that matters most to them. Soon, we’ll add another filter for pets too.”

The Xfinity Indoor/Outdoor camera is weather-resistant and includes night vision. You can monitor live video from connected cameras with a mobile phone app.

Xfinity Home security customers with a security camera and 24/7 video recording can say, “Xfinity Home, where’s the Grinch?” to view the still images captured by the camera on their home television.

Comcast quoted former Secret Service Special Agent and national security expert Evy Poumpouras, who said, “More packages will arrive on people’s doorsteps over the next few weeks than any other time of year and theft has become an increasing concern among homeowners. There are simple and easy steps consumers can take to protect themselves, from signing up for real-time package tracking alerts to installing a home security camera to keep an eye on deliveries when they’re not home.”

Wakefield Research conducted the Comcast survey during the last week of October. Among the findings, the survey revealed that 72 percent of U.S. adults who live in a house or townhome use various strategies to protect themselves from package theft including staying home from work, having packages held at shipping centers, and having deliveries sent to family members, friends, or neighbors.

The survey also found that while 74 percent of Americans think visible security cameras can deter home package theft, only 31 percent have cameras installed.

Check out Digital Trends latest report on the best home security cameras of 2018.

Smart Home

People are stealing Ring doorbells (and it’s no knock-knock joke)

Ring Video Doorbell thefts in a Denver neighborhood raise questions about how much security the smart home devices actually provide. One homeowner and the police have a video of the theft. Here's what to do if your Ring device is stolen.
Smart Home

These wireless security cameras are a wire-free way to protect your home

Home security cameras can give you piece of mind, but if they have wires, are limited in where you can put them. We've rounded up the best battery-operated home security cameras to give you flexibility along with your security.
Smart Home

Porch pirate problems? Keep them away with these tips and tricks

The holiday season is fast approaching and the packages are arriving on our doorsteps. Are you worried about porch pirates stealing your gifts this holiday season? Here are some tips to help protect your purchases.
Deals

Best deals on home security cameras to save you from package thieves

Home security camera systems can help keep your home and your family safe. Amazon's deals on Blink security cameras and Ring Video Doorbells also help you save money on devices you can access regardless of your current location.
News

Listen up! White noise device may make VR motion sickness a thing of the past

A simple device that sends white noise vibrations to the inner ear could be all it takes to fix the long-running problem of nausea in virtual reality. The developers are now seeking FDA approval.
Mobile

Ditch your smartphone for a year and win $100k from Vitaminwater

Vitaminwater is willing to part with $100,000 if you're willing to part with your smartphone partner for a year. Could you last for a year armed with only a 1996-era phone? Here's your chance to find out.
Cars

What’s next for in-car entertainment? Audi believes it knows

Audi is bringing two technologies to CES 2019. The first turns a car -- a luxury sedan, in this case -- into a drive-in movie theater. The second is presented as a new entertainment format that turns the journey into the destination.
Gaming

Nintendo pulls the plug on making more SNES Classic, NES Classic systems

Nintendo extended production of the NES Classic and SNES Classic into 2018, but once the current supply of consoles is gone, the company won't be making more. Instead, you'll have to use Nintendo Switch Online.
Gaming

Fancy ‘Kingdom Hearts III’ PlayStation 4 Pro launches alongside game in January

A limited edition PlayStation 4 Pro bundle for Kingdom Hearts III will launch alongside the game in January. The system included has a special design on the side, as does the controller.
Computing

Latest Facebook bug exposed up to 6.8 million users’ private photos

An API bug recently left an impact on Facebook users. Though the issue has since been fixed, some of the apps on the platform had a wrongful access to consumers photos for 12 days between September 13 and September 25. 
Emerging Tech

Thrill-seekers will be able to pilot themselves in a giant drone as soon as 2019

Want to hitch a ride on a giant drone? The startup Lift Aircraft is gearing up to let paying customers fly its 18-rotor giant drones over assorted scenic landscapes across the U.S.
Computing

You can now get a Surface Laptop 2 for $800 at the Microsoft Store

Along with deals on other variants, starting configurations of Microsoft's Surface Laptop 2 are now going for $800 online at its retail store, cutting $200 from its usual $1,000 starting price. 
Emerging Tech

CRISPR gene therapy regulates hunger, staves off severe obesity in mice

Researchers from UC San Francisco have demonstrated how CRISPR gene editing can be used to prevent severe obesity in mice, without making a single edit to the mouse's genome. Here's how.
Gaming

‘Fortnite’ removes the Infinity Blade weapon after player backlash

Following player backlash over the Infinity Blade weapon's inclusion in Fortnite's battle royale mode, Epic Games decided to remove the weapon from the game completely. It was not limited to a special mode.