Skip to main content

Comcast wants you to take control of your smart home through your TV

Comcast is looking to take control of your smart home. The company is reportedly testing a new system for broadband-only customers that will allow them to use their TVs as a central control system for everything from connected light bulbs to security cameras, according to NBC.

The new system will use the same hardware and software that powers the company’s X1 video service, allowing those with internet-only Comcast subscriptions to get more functionality than ever before available.

It will reportedly also allow viewers to stream video services like Amazon Prime Video, Netflix, and Hulu, though, according to a report from CNET, the company isn’t really looking to take aim at industry-leading streaming box makers like Roku. Instead, it appears Comcast is looking toward even bigger companies like Amazon and Google, both of which have made a huge push into the smart home space in recent years.

The new Comcast streaming hub service could, surprise surprise, cost subscribers an extra fee, but there’s no word on exactly what that will be or how the new service will be rolled out to customers.

This isn’t the first time we’ve heard smart home rumblings from Comcast.

“There’s lots of opportunities now that this hub exists to introduce IoT (Internet of Things) in new and unique ways to the mass market,” Xfinity Home and Comcast general manager and senior vice president Daniel Herscovici told us in January, around the time of the last CES conference in Las Vegas.

Using a TV as the center of one’s smart home makes sense, and the fact that most Comcast subscribers already have Comcast-licensed hardware in their home means that the service could have a fairly large user base at its outset. Competitors like Amazon and Google require those looking to add smart home control to their home to purchase a small smart speaker, at the very least, to get similar functionality.

It’s hard to imagine this initiative could be a huge failure for Comcast. The internet and cable giant already has a healthy list of smart home manufacturers listed as partners, including Nest, Philips Hue, Tile, Zen, GE, Carrier, Chamberlain, Ecobee, and Singled.

Parker Hall
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Parker Hall is a writer and musician from Portland, OR. He is a graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Oberlin…
Everything you wanted to know about Filmmaker Mode on your TV
Filmmaker Mode Explained

If you’ve bought a television recently, there’s a good chance you’ve seen Filmmaker Mode (among others) in your the settings menu. If you’ve tried Filmmaker Mode already, you might already have opinions about how it looks. And if you’re like a lot of folks I hear from, you are not a fan.

Filmmaker Mode is not objectively bad — but it also is very misunderstood. I’m going to cover what Filmmaker Mode is and what it isn’t, and how you might be able to get what’s good about Filmmaker Mode without having to deal with what so many people dislike.

Read more
Stay cool this summer with these smart home tips and tricks
Ikea's Fyrtur smart home blind

Warmer weather is finally arriving in most locations across the country, bringing with it pool parties, summer vacations, and plenty of outdoor fun. And if you're looking for a way to make your life easier this summer, now's a great time to upgrade your smart home. From adding a smart thermostat to your home to installing a smart sprinkler system, there are plenty of ways to build a smart home that's designed to handle the summer heat.

Ready to save money on your electric and water bills? Here's are ideas on how to upgrade your smart home this summer, as well as other tips to help around the home.
Upgrade to smart shades

Read more
Yale Keypad Touch lets you control the front door with your fingerprints
The Yale Keypad Touch installed on wooden siding.

Yale released the Approach retrofit smart lock last month -- the first-ever retrofit lock from the popular company. This month it's following up with the Yale Keypad Touch, a wireless accessory that lets you control the Yale Approach with nothing more than your fingerprints.

Because the Yale Approach smart lock doesn't include a keypad, most shoppers will want to add one to their purchase. Without a keypad, you'll be left controlling it with your smartphone. Yale previously let you bundle in the Yale Keypad with the Approach, turning it into something more akin to a traditional smart lock.

Read more