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Koenigsegg is considering building lesser models to broaden its customer base

“Normal” is probably the last word that comes to mind when considering Swedish automaker Koenigsegg. The supercar manufacturer is responsible for some of the most outrageous performance machines on the planet, including its two latest creations, the One:1 and Regera, which make 1,341 and 1,489 horsepower, respectively.

Given its track record, it comes as a bit of a surprise that Koenigsegg is now discussing plans to introduce “regular” models for the consuming public. I think we can safely say that Koenigsegg’s version of “regular” vehicles will prove to be far outside the financial means of, say, Toyota Camry shoppers, but its proposed sub-brand will reportedly include a four-door model and other more utilitarian body styles.

Speaking to Car Throttle, Christian von Koenigsegg mentioned that the advanced technology pulsing within its supercars could be very useful in other models, and that he is considering working with other automakers to produce such vehicles. The company’s founder clarified that only the unique, ultra-high performance creations would wear the Koenigsegg badge, while any lesser projects would receive distinctive branding.

Related: Koenigsegg Prices Its Regera Hybrid Supercar at $2.34 Million

Some of the unique Koenigsegg engineering that could trickle down to its sub-brands includes its hybrid technology, active aerodynamics, single-speed Direct Drive transmission, and lightweight build materials.

Most likely, these offerings would rival other elite automakers like Rolls Royce, Bentley, Aston Martin, and Porsche, all of whom have pursued new body styles with either a luxury or performance orientation.

And there’s good news for supremely wealthy Americans who like the sound of Koenigsegg’s sub-brand: the Swedish automaker has already adapted its latest supercars to meet U.S. safety regulations, so there’s a good chance any future vehicles will also target the U.S. market.