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Toyota goes Back to the Future with a Christopher Lloyd and Michael J. Fox reunion

Toyota has reunited Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd for a special Back to the Future-themed video, in honor of the 30th anniversary of the film, and the launch of Toyota’s Mirai hydrogen fuel cell vehicle.

This is just a teaser and the full video will go live on Oct. 21, 2015, the date the Mirai goes on sale. That also happens to be the date where Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) and Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) travel to in Back to the Future Part II. The teaser doesn’t really show it, but the full video will promote the Mirai and it’s “futuristic” technology.

In the video, Fox and Lloyd chat about what technologies the film series assumed would be realities and what are actually realities today.

In a statement, Fox said “Over the years we’ve had a lot of fun predicting which Back to the Future fictional 2015 technology would arrive by the real year. Now that we’re a week away, I think fans are going to have a good time with what Toyota sees as a true possibility for transportation. It’s actually really cool.”

Related: Toyota Reveals Full Specs On The 2016 Mirai Hydrogen Car

Toyota also plans to reveal a recreation of the Tacoma that Marty McFly drove in the movies.

As a quick refresher, the Toyota Mirai will initially be sold just in California, where there’s infrastructure for hydrogen fueling, and it will have a range of about 300 miles. Refueling should take just five minutes and all fuel is included in the purchase of the vehicle for the first three years.

To further put owners at ease, Toyota is offering an eight-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty and after tax incentives, the Mirai will cost just about $45,000 (it will retail for $58,325 from the factory).

Though fuel will be free at first, places to fill-up will be limited to about 20 locations in all of California. That’s far less than all the available electric charging stations, though a five-minute refill is significantly faster than an 80-percent recharge of even the quickest electric systems, which take about 30 minutes.