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Sog’s newest multitool is the Swiss Army Knife of belt buckles

Why it matters to you

Sync II belt buckle may look like it's only good for keeping your pants up, but it packs a plethora of tools to rival a Swiss Army Knife.

It’s a question all well-adjusted, serious adults have asked themselves at one point or other: what belt would a real-life Batman use to keep his pants up?

Short of any companies we know of that are producing bright yellow utility belts, the prize may have to go to SOG’s new Sync II belt buckle. It may look like a relatively inoffensive metal buckle, but it’s actually a pretty nifty multitool — comprising a plethora of tools that would rival a Swiss Army Knife.

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These include (deep breath) a straight blade, bolt/nut gripper, bottle opener, crimpers, 3-sided file, medium and small flat screwdrivers, Phillips screwdriver, pliers, ruler, scissors, and soft wire cutter.

Sure, there’s no Batarang in there, but what do you expect for $80?

“Anybody who’s ever held a multitool knows part of the appeal is how all the components fold up inside of them,” Matt Crawford, a member of the public relations team for manufacturer SOG, told Digital Trends. “From a knife blade to screwdrivers to plier heads, a multitool is this superb, compact little portable toolbox. There a couple of ways to make use of the shape: you can wear it as a belt buckle, you can stuff into a pack or purse, you can clip it on to something. The idea behind the Syncs is to change the shape of multitools without sacrificing their usefulness.”

The Sync II was originally designed by Jameson Ellis, a craftsman who also offers an Etsy store packed with fairly unique items. However, it is being manufactured (along with its stablemate, the Sync I) by SOG Knives & Tools, a company which has been linked to the U.S. military since it was founded 30 years ago.

The Sync buckles fit with the company’s focus on functional design and aesthetic engineering, both of which have been part of its DNA since day one. Can you think of a better way to stop your pants falling down?