Live out your 007 fantasy with this special edition Aston DBS Superleggera

Aston Martin is plumbing the depths of its longstanding association with James Bond. The British automaker is releasing a special edition of its DBS Superleggera to celebrate the 50th anniversary of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. That film isn’t the most memorable one in the 007 canon, but the Superleggera’s ancestor was its star car.

Aston plans to make just 50 James Bond special edition DBS Superleggeras, and they’ll all be painted olive green to match the 1969 Aston Martin DBS from On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Black and gray interior trim was designed to match the 1969 car as well. Aston also threw in a splash of red interior trim as a nod to the movie car’s red-trimmed glovebox, which Bond used to store a telescopic rifle sight.

Owners will also have the option to add a drinks case for the trunk, with room for two bottles of champagne and four champagne flutes. It’s an unusual feature both because it sends a mixed message about drinking and driving, and because Aston didn’t think to include a martini shaker in a 007-themed car.

No apparent mechanical changes were made, but the DBS Superleggera was already pretty potent. This car is a lighter (“Superleggera” is Italian for “super light”), more powerful version of the Aston Martin DB11. Its 5.2-liter twin-turbocharged V12 produces 715 horsepower and 664 pound-feet of torque. That’s 135 hp and 199 lb-ft more than you get in a DB11. Aston claims the Superleggera will do zero to 60 mph in 3.4 seconds and reach a top speed of 211 mph, which should make chasing down Blofeld a breeze.

Aston hasn’t released U.S. pricing for the On Her Majesty’s Secret Service DBS Superleggera special edition, but it will retail for 300,007 pounds in the U.K. Kudos to Aston for working a Bond reference into that price, which works out to about $380,000 at current exchange rates.

Another Bond-themed Aston Martin is in the works, and it will get more than just a special paint job. Aston Martin is recreating the DB5 from 1964’s Goldfinger — complete with working gadgets. The automaker will build 25 new re-creations identical to the original movie cars, and priced at an astronomical $3 million each. But because Aston can’t certify new cars built to 1960s safety standards, the Goldfinger DB5s won’t be road legal.

Editors' Recommendations