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2017 Honda Civic Type R to have U.S. debut at AutoCon in Los Angeles

2017 Honda Civic Type R
Image used with permission by copyright holder
Following its global debut in Geneva earlier this month, the first production 2017 Type R will be unveiled stateside at this year’s AutoCon convention. The automotive performance and tuning event will be held in Los Angeles on March 26 (today), and the Type R is scheduled to hit the stage at 4 p.m. PT, according to a press release from Honda.

AutoCon has been holding events made by and for automotive enthusiasts since 2010, and prior shows have been held in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Miami, New York City, and New Jersey.

“From the exclusive vehicles on display to the one-of-a-kind ‘drive up’ main stage, the goal of AutoCon is to create a positive environment where attendees of the event can converge, learn, and share common interests with one another,” a passage from the con’s site reads. “With its core focus on the automotive industry, AutoCon is a place where extraordinary vehicle builds are debuted, product launches happen, news is announced, and the future is introduced.”

Powered by a 2.0-liter DOHC, direct-injected and turbocharged i-VTEC in-line 4-cylinder engine, the Civic Type R produced 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500-4,500 rpm. Power is sent to the front wheels via a 6-speed manual transmission. The new Type R will be the fastest, most powerful Honda ever sold in the U.S.

While its aggressive looks may be polarizing, there’s no arguing the hype around the Civic Type R’s contribution to a resurgence of hot hatches in the U.S. Honda says that it will be available in late spring with an MSRP in the mid-$30,000 range.

For those on the other side of the nation, the Type R will also make an appearance at the New York International Auto Show on April 12. Digital Trends will be on hand to cover the event, and we will post more information as it approaches.

Albert Khoury
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Al started his career at a downtown Manhattan publisher, and has since worked with digital and print publications. He's…
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