Skip to main content

Apple Security Research website launches to protect your Mac

Apple just launched a new website that’s dedicated to macOS and iOS security and there are already two blog posts that provide examples of what to expect, one providing a deep dive into memory allocation within the XNU kernel at the heart of all Apple devices, and another discussing the improved security bounty process.

The new website will undoubtedly become a critical resource for Apple security researchers, both providing information and serving as a hub for submitting bounties. The Apple Security Research website is also where you can apply for an official Apple Security Research Device (SRD) to help with identifying vulnerabilities by providing special access to what are normally protected areas of iOS.

Apple Seurity Research website has resources for bug bounty hunters.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Since macOS, iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, and tvOS are all based on the same core software libraries, a security flaw in one could affect others. Apple explains that an iPhone that it has set up as an SRD remains Apple’s property and is provided on a renewable, annual basis for security research only and should be used in a controlled setting.

In addition to the SRD, Apple provides a greater incentive for security researchers by making it easier to report any vulnerabilities found in macOS, bundled apps, and other Apple operating systems. Apple claims its engineers will review and investigate every submission as well as post notifications to acknowledge bugs and let you know if you qualify for Apple’s Security Bounty program.

Apple’s bug bounty program pays out millions of dollars but it has proven to be a frustrating experience for some security researchers and developers. Perhaps that will change with the launch of the new Apple Security Research website.

Editors' Recommendations

Alan Truly
Alan is a Computing Writer living in Nova Scotia, Canada. A tech-enthusiast since his youth, Alan stays current on what is…
Don’t download the latest macOS Ventura update just yet
The 14-inch MacBook Pro with M3 Max chip seen from behind.

We have a warning if your MacBook or other Mac machine is still running macOS Ventura. The latest macOS Ventura 13.6.6 update is bringing a lot of big bugs, and it is affecting the way that people are using their favorite Apple products, so you might want to hold off on downloading the update.

Originally released back on March 25, this problematic update came at the same time as macOS Sonoma 14.4.1, which patched issues with Java, USB hubs, and more. Unfortunately, though, macOS Ventura 13.6.6 is introducing some new issues of its own. Spotted by the folks at GottaBeMobile, Mac users have taken to Apple's support forums to complain of everyday issues linked to this release that are breaking their Macs.

Read more
How to take a screenshot on a Mac
The keyboard and trackpad of the MacBook Pro 14-inch.

For most new Mac users -- especially if they're coming from Windows -- one of the first questions they need to ask is how to take a screenshot on a Mac? There's no dedicated Print Screen key like there is on Windows, but there is keyboard shortcut, and if you want something more akin to Microsoft's Windows Snipping tool, there are some great screenshot apps you can use, too.

Here's how to take a screenshot on a Mac in a few different ways.
How to take a screenshot using keyboard shortcuts
MacOS keyboard shortcuts are the quickest ways to take screenshots, whether you're capturing the entire screen or just a portion. By default, Apple's methods save your screenshot to the desktop, but if you want to copy the screenshot to the clipboard, there's a keyboard shortcut you can use instead.
How to capture a selected area

Read more
The biggest threat to the MacBook this year might come from Apple itself
The MacBook Air on a white table.

MacBooks have held a dominant position in the laptop world for the past few years. Though there have been meaningful rivals from the Windows side of the aisle, the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro still feel like they hold an unshakeable lead at the moment.

But according to the latest reports, the most serious challenger to the MacBook's reign won't come from Windows -- it'll come from within Apple in the form of some very advanced new iPads.
What's a computer?

Read more