Skip to main content

David Braben develops $25 PC for schoolchildren

raspberry-piDavid Braben, British game developer and co-founder of Frontier Developments, has created an ultra-low cost computer the size of a USB stick called Raspberry Pi. The expected price would be a measly $25 for a fully-configured system. He says he’s developed the PC in order to encourage the pursuit of computer programming in children.

But what can you expect from a system that comes for less than the cost of a video game? The tiny PC sports an HDMI port at its head and a USB port at its tail, giving it the ability to be plugged into a TV, hooked up to a USB keyboard or combined with a touch screen for a low cost tablet. The computer packs a 700MHz ARM11 processor with 128MB of SDRAM. As far as graphics go, it runs OpenGL ES 2.0 and has 1080p output.

At the stage the prototype is in now, developers seem to be favoring the Linux based Ubuntu OS for Raspberry Pi’s initial equipment; which means OpenOffice, Firefox, GIMP for image editing etc., all ready for a user to play around with.

Braben feels that the way schools teach children about computers leaves them uninspired, that too much gets in the way of their enthusiasm; today’s computer classes only prepare kids to navigate office jobs. He says these low cost PC will allow children to do typical things such as go on Facebook or tweet, but it will also give them the freedom to become creators of products they typically consume.

A BBC article says that there’s a lot of work needed for the Raspberry Pi and compares David Braben’s project to the One Laptop Per Child idea, which attempted to distribute $100 laptops to developing world children. The laptop program has had problems delivering on the prices it advertised to governments.

Braben believes he’ll be putting out the little computers within a year. The distributing will be done by the Raspberry Pi Foundation, a new charitable organization.

Jeff Hughes
Former Digital Trends Contributor
I'm a SF Bay Area-based writer/ninja that loves anything geek, tech, comic, social media or gaming-related.
How to type an em dash in Windows
Overhead view of someone typing on a surface laptop.

The em dash is a supremely useful (and fashionable) piece of punctuation used in writing and editing, often in place of a comma, colon, or parenthesis. While you might want to utilize it to make your grammar look fancy, the symbol on a computer can be a little challenging to access if you don’t know how, especially on the Windows operating system.

Fortunately, there are several methods available to insert the em dash punctuation into your text. Check out the following tips to learn how to become more familiar with the em dash on your computer.
Keyboard
The em dash keyboard shortcut is one of the easier methods to access the punctuation. Though it might take a little bit of getting used to, once you master it ,you’ll be an em dash typing master. Turn on Number Lock by pressing the NumLock key on the upper number row of your keyboard. Then hold the Alt key and type the sequence 0151 on the numeric keypad of your keyboard. Release the Alt key and the em dash will appear.

Read more
8K VR comes to the Quest 3
A Meta Quest 3 sits on a wooden floor in moody backlighting.

The best place to watch 360-degree videos is in VR, and the Meta Quest 3 just got a big upgrade in quality that makes the experience even better after Google updated its YouTube VR app to support 8K resolution.

8K might sound excessive since even the best VR headsets, like the Apple Vision Pro and the recently announced Pimax Crystal Super, have resolutions closer to 4K-per-eye. However, you can only see a third or less of a 360-degree video at once.

Read more
AI is about to change video production forever
An object being highlighted in a scene from a video.

Generative AI is just starting to break into the world of video, but some new features in Premiere Pro are taking things to the next level. Adobe has announced a host of generative AI video tools that it will be introducing to the Premiere Pro video editing suite throughout the year, and they look pretty incredible.

The brand is working to expand on its own AI model, Adobe Firefly, which started as a text-to-image generator last March and has quickly expanded its AI brand across several editing mediums.

Read more