Hands on: HP enters the supersized tablet fray with the Envy Rove 20

HP touts the Rove as “the desktop that leaves the desk behind,” but at nearly 12 pounds, we’re not so sure about that. Still, its fantastic touch display and inventive hinge may be enough for it to compete with other all-in-one/tablet hybrids.

Check out our review of the HP Envy Rove 20 all-in-one/tablet hybrid.

Sony did it. Dell did it. Acer did it. Now HP is doing it. The world of giant Windows 8 tablets just got bigger with the introduction of the HP Envy Rove, a 20-inch all-in-one PC set to go on sale in July. The Rove will get the benefit of Intel’s new 4th-generation Core processors as well as a battery to keep it going even when it’s not plugged in to the wall. Given the size, it’s not likely to be as portable as some of its competitors, though we expect it to be a fun family gaming platform.

Size matters

The Envy Rove is technically “portable.” It has a battery and you can move it, but it’s large, thick, and somewhat heavy at 11.86 pounds. You’re not going to want to move it around much. And unlike the Dell XPS 18, you probably won’t want to put it in your lap, either. No, where the Rove is most likely to find a great home is the tabletop, where it can easily switch between being a computer, a TV, and a virtual game board. The stand on the back is sturdy and will hold the Rove at almost any angle without moving, but it’s not hard to adjust. It tucks in flush with the back so you can lay the machine flat to play games.

HP Envy Rove

Game time

Monopoly, Fingertapps JigsWar PuzzleFingertapps Musical Instruments, and Disney Fairies come pre-loaded, and we enjoyed trying them out. With the proliferation of big tablets and table PCs like the Lenovo Horizon, it won’t be long before more games of this type are available via the Windows Store. The Rove is well-equipped to handle them since the screen is bright and crisp with wide viewing angles (we were told 178 degrees) and 10-point touch. This is not the system to get if you’re a hard-core gamer because it won’t come with anything fancier than Intel’s integrated HD graphics. It’s strictly a casual/family games type of machine.

A cord cutter’s dream (in more than one way)

The 1,600 x 900 IPS LED screen is also excellent for watching video, and the inclusion of Beats Audio and pretty impressive built-in speakers makes it a nice multimedia hub. Load up Hulu, Netflix, Amazon, or any other streaming service and the Rove becomes a cord-cutter’s dream. The all-in-one desktop incorporates next-gen 802.11 ac Wi-Fi technology, so if you upgrade your home router for even faster speed, the Rove can keep pace. HP rates the battery at a little less than 4 hours off the charger, which is plenty of time for a game or a movie. 

Other specs include three USB 3.0 ports, Intel Wireless Display (WiDi) technology, up to 1TB of internal storage, and a hybrid SSD/hard drive system (usually found in Ultrabooks) that should keep the Rove speedy while still giving you a ton of storage space.

Conclusion

The Rove isn’t the thinnest or lightest of this new breed of big tablets, but can it stand up to the competition? We think so. Ultra portability isn’t the main driver behind this type of all-in-one. No matter what, tablet all-in-ones like these are going to be heavy. The concept is more about flexibility. The Rove doesn’t have to only sit in the family room or the kitchen, it can go into the kids’ room on weekends or sit in the living room as a second screen while watching TV. It’s not going to get moved all the time every day, but, when you do have to move the thing, it won’t be a hassle.

The HP Rove will be available in July. Pricing has not been announced.

Gaming

New ‘Battlefield V’ patch gives Nvidia’s ray tracing support a chance to shine

‘Battlefield V’ is the first game to use Nvidia’s ray tracing support, now available with the RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti graphics cards. The feature can, in an ideal scenario, make the game look better, but the performance hit may not be…
Product Review

It's not the sharpest tool, but the Surface Go does it all for $400

Microsoft has launched the $400 Surface Go to take on both the iPad and Chromebooks, all without compromising its core focus on productivity. Does it work as both a tablet and a PC?
Deals

Here are the best laptop deals for December 2018

Whether you need a new laptop for school or work or you're just doing some holiday shopping for a special someone, we've got you covered: These are the best laptop deals going right now, from discounted MacBooks to on-the-go gaming PCs.
Computing

Changing file associations in Windows 10 is quick and easy with these steps

Learning how to change file associations can make editing certain file types much quicker than manually selecting your preferred application every time you open them. Just follow these short steps and you'll be on your way in no time.
Computing

Intel's dedicated GPU is not far off -- here's what we know

Did you hear? Intel is working on a dedicated graphics card. It's called Arctic Sound and though we don't know a lot about it, we know that Intel has some ex-AMD Radeon graphics engineers developing it.
Computing

Edit, sign, append, and save with six of the best PDF editors

There are plenty of PDF editors to be had online, and though the selection is robust, finding a solid solution with the tools you need can be tough. Here, we've rounded up best PDF editors, so you can edit no matter your budget or OS.
Computing

How to easily record your laptop screen with apps you already have

Learning how to record your computer screen shouldn't be a challenge. Lucky for you, our comprehensive guide lays out how to do so using a host of methods, including both free and premium utilities, in both MacOS and Windows 10.
Computing

From beautiful to downright weird, check out these great dual monitor wallpapers

Multitasking with two monitors doesn't necessarily mean you need to split your screens with two separate wallpapers. From beautiful to downright weird, here are our top sites for finding the best dual monitor wallpapers for you.
Computing

Capture screenshots with print screen and a few alternative methods

Capturing a screenshot of your desktop is easier than you might think, and it's the kind of thing you'll probably need to know. Here's how to perform the important function in just a few, easy steps.
Computing

These cheap laptops will make you wonder why anyone spends more

Looking for a budget notebook for school, work, or play? The best budget laptops, including our top pick -- the Asus ZenBook UX331UA -- will get the job done without digging too deeply into your pockets.
Mobile

Vanquish lag for good with the best routers for gaming

Finding the best routers for gaming is no easy task. With so many out there, how do you know which to pick? We've looked at the many options available and put together a list of our lag-free favorites.
Computing

Stop your PC's vow of silence with these tips on how to fix audio problems

Sound problems got you down? Don't worry, with a few tweaks and tricks we'll get your sound card functioning as it should, and you listening to your favorite tunes and in-game audio in no time.
Deals

These Raspberry Pi 3 bundles will cover everyone, from coders to gamers

The Raspberry Pi 3 is a low-budget computing platform capable of doing just about anything. We rounded up a handful of the best Raspberry Pi 3 bundles to get you started on a variety of DIY projects.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Folding canoes and ultra-fast water filters

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!