PBS hackers set their sights on Sony

Lulzsec-hackersThe hacker group responsible for breaking into the website of PBS and posting a fake story about deceased rapper Tupac Shakur living in New Zealand has a new target: Sony.

Known as Lulzsec, the group has already launched one attack against Sony’s BMG website in Japan. And since its new-found place in the spotlight after this weekend’s PBS.org shenanigans, Lulzsec has been boasting about its plans to take Sony to task, warning that this was the “beginning of the end” for Sony.

The group’s latest anti-Sony campaign has been dubbed “Sownage,” which is short for Sony Ownage. And Lulzsec is keep its supporters — and Sony — up-to-date with its attacks on its Twitter feed.

“Hey @Sony, you know we’re making off with a bunch of your internal stuff right now and you haven’t even noticed?” LulzSec Tweeted late Tuesday. “Slow and steady, guys.”

Of course, this is far from the first time Sony has had to deal with hackers. The company is still recovering from a round of attacks carried out in the middle of April that left its PlayStation Network in shambles and the private information of around 100 million Sony customers at risk. On top of that, a variety of other Sony websites have been targeted by hackers, in one way or another.

Whoever carried out the attack on Sony’s PSN remains unknown, though the company suspects the perpetrators to be members of the notorious hacker group Anonymous, who, for its part, has firmly denied any involvement.

Lulzsec has so far distanced itself from anything having to do with Sony’s gaming sectors, and has instead chosen to focus on its music business. (Hence, the attack focusing on its BMG web properties.) The group has tried to calm gamers, saying on Twitter that they have no plans to target the PSN. But that doesn’t mean they can relate to Sony sympathizers.

“Keep on crying, Sony fanboys,” Lulzsec Tweeted. “Your tears create the sea and your whining creates the wind that we so gracefully use to traverse onward.”

So, what will come of their attacks against Sony? We’ll all just have to wait and see. Luckily, the group will surely let us know on Twitter as soon as it happens, whatever it is.

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