3D-printed robot called Jimmy on its way from Intel, can tweet and pour beers

3d printed robot called jimmy on its way from intel

If you have an interest in DIY and robots then you may like to know that Intel is planning to launch a “social robot” called Jimmy that you can put together yourself.

Researchers at Intel Future Showcase 2014 in New York City said Tuesday that the chip maker and its partners are planning to release a DIY kit with parts such as servo motors, batteries and other internal components, while the exoskeleton can be 3D-printed to create unique designs – so just like in the real world, no two Jimmys will look the same.

The kit will cost $1,500 and should be out in September, Intel said, with the reasonable price tag made possible thanks to the use of the company’s low-cost Edison board.

The Jimmy shown off on various TV shows recently sports a cute design that’s likely to remind you of Honda’s Asimo or SoftBank’s recently unveiled Pepper robot.

Standing at 45 centimeters, Jimmy sports two cameras to help him identify nearby objects and can apparently walk, talk, dance, and even tweet. He can also translate languages and, perhaps most importantly of all, pour a cold beer (or any drink, presumably).

Speaking this week to Bloomberg about the innovative android, Intel’s Brian David Johnson said the basic hardware for Jimmy is all set, leaving the development team to focus on getting the software right, with an app store planned for later in the year.

Intel intends to give away the design files for Jimmy, giving people flexibility in how they design their android and allowing them to “make the robot personal” using the downloaded apps.

Highlighting the ease with which people will be able to build the bot, Johnson said, “You don’t need to understand artificial intelligence, you don’t need to have a PhD, all you need to do is download apps.” And have access to a 3D printer, too.

Having been slow to jump on the mobile bandwagon, Intel seems intent on getting stuck in with other emerging tech such as wearables and robotics.

Its robot kit will go on sale at 21stCenturyRobot when it becomes available in the fall.

[via PC World, Re/code]

Smart Home

The future of food could make kitchens and grocery stores obsolete

Will we be 3D printing our food in 20 years? Will grocery stores as we know them disappear? The 2018 Smart Kitchen Summit included a lot of wild predictions about the future of cooking.
Mobile

Galaxy S10 leak shows radical tech that could help Samsung kill the notch

While we still may be months away from an announcement, there's no doubt about it: Samsung is working hard on its successor to the Galaxy S9. Here's everything we know about the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S10.
Home Theater

Google Chromecast and Chromecast Ultra: Everything you need to know

Google's Chromecast plugs into your TV's HDMI port, allowing you to stream content from your tablet, laptop, or smartphone directly to your TV. Here's what you need to know about all iterations, including the 4K-ready Chromecast Ultra.
Mobile

Which Verizon plan is best for you? We check out family, individual, and prepaid

Verizon offers lots of plans for individuals, your family, and folks who want prepaid service. Here is everything you need to know about Verizon's plans, from data packages and smartphones to Big Red's prepaid plans.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: A.I.-powered cat toys, wallets, food containers

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Emerging Tech

Here are the best (and least likely to explode) hoverboards you can buy

With widespread reports of cheap, knock-off Chinese hoverboards exploding, these self-balancing scooters may be getting a rough reputation. They're not all bad, though. Ride in style with our picks for the best -- and safest -- hoverboards
Emerging Tech

From electron microscopes to X-rays, high-tech tools expose low-tech art forgery

At the Indianapolis Museum of Art, conservation scientist Greg Smith and Glennis Rayermann, then a Ph.D student, used high-tech equipment to determine if a painting was made by master forger Icilio Federico Joni.
Product Review

Parrot Anafi drone review

It’s definitely not perfect, and there are a few little things that could be improved, but even so, Anafi is unquestionably the best drone that Parrot has ever made.
Emerging Tech

Looking for a good read? Here are the best, most eye-opening books about tech

Sometimes it's sensible to put down the gadgets and pick up a good old-fashioned book -- to read about the latest gadgets, of course. Here are the tech books you need to check out.
Emerging Tech

SpaceX Starlink: Here’s everything you need to know

SpaceX Starlink is the name of Elon Musk's ambitious plan to blanket the globe with high speed broadband internet via a network of satellites. Here's everything you need to know about it
Emerging Tech

Flying food: Uber has set a target date to use drones for meal delivery

Uber is better known for transporting people around town, but it also has a growing meal-delivery business called UberEats. It currently uses drivers and cyclists to deliver the food, but also has plans to use drones.
Wearables

NYPD pulls thousands of body cams after one explodes

The NYPD has recalled thousands of body cameras after one of them exploded during an officer's shift on Sunday, October 21. No one was injured in the incident, which is thought to have been caused by the device's battery.
Emerging Tech

There’s finally a way to trace ‘untraceable’ 3D printed guns

To help track 3D-printed guns, researchers have developed a new algorithm which is able to identify which 3D printer was used to print an object, based on its unique fingerprint. Here's how.
Emerging Tech

These solar-powered water purifiers can produce 30,000 gallons of water per day

Problems with contaminated water? Quench Water & Solar's water purifiers can purify up to 30,000 gallons of fresh water per day and it's offering the technology to whoever wants it.