Kickstarter arm-mounted jet drive will propel snorkelers through the water

We can just see “Q” saying, “Now pay attention, 007!” to Mr. Bond while showing off this new device.

Resembling something straight out of a Sean Connery-era James Bond movie, Scubalec is an exciting new Kickstarter crowdfunding project for a handheld, arm-mounted personal jet drive, designed to propel intrepid users through the water.

“People go snorkeling because it’s a great way to explore the underwater world,” creator Un-Yong Park told Digital Trends. “For those people who love snorkeling, we’ve created a handy device to bring even more fun to the underwater experience. Simply put Scubalec on your arm, and it pulls you just in the direction you point, easy and simple.”

The Scubalec comprises two small jet drives combined with a 7.500 mA/h lithium-ion battery that, fully charged, will provide a running time of 10-12 minutes’ worth of continuous propulsion. Park describes the experience of using it as being “like a cyclist with a tailwind on their back.”

arm mounted jet drive scubalec 03

To give it a suitably retro appearance (did we mention this looks like something out of an old spy movie?), Park took his design inspiration from the iconic P-51 Mustang, a single seat fighter aircraft used in World War II, and active from the 1940s through the 60s. The result is undeniably neat, and sure to be an attention-grabber on your next family vacation.

Currently the Scubalec project has raised around one third of its 10,000-euro ($10,700) target, with 28 days still to go. A pledge of $297 will secure you a Scubalec and wall charger, with postage included. Shipping is set for this June.

A more expensive option with an extra battery is also available. You know, in case whichever megalomaniacal evil villain’s island volcano base you’re headed toward happens to be more than 10-12 minutes’ swim away.

Just remember to wear your freshly ironed white dinner jacket and ruffled shirt under your wetsuit, so you’re good to go the moment that you arrive on dry land.

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