Oru’s foldable kayak is back and bigger than ever — and it still fits in your trunk

Back in 2012, a relatively unknown company by the name of Oru unveiled a crazy new product — an origami-inspired kayak capable of folding down to the size of a suitcase. It was a huge hit on Kickstarter, and gathered up nearly half a million dollars before the campaign ended. Now, three years later, Oru is back with a new and improved version.

Whereas the company’s original kayak, the Bay, was only twelve feet long, its upcoming Coast series kayak stretches a full 16 feet. This makes it considerably faster and more efficient to paddle, as the extra surface area allows it to sit higher on the water, thereby reducing drag and help the boat fly across any rippling aquatic surface. The Coast also has more stability and a lot more space than its predecessor, providing you with ample room to stow gear.

The amazing thing is that, despite being four feet longer and considerably more spacious, this new version still folds down, origami style, to the same size as Oru’s first generation kayak. Essentially, this means that you can fit a full-sized boat inside the trunk of your car, and therefore don’t need to spend a bunch of extra cash on specialized roof racks in order to transport the kayak from place to place. Oru even offers a carrying case that allows you to carry the Coast around on your back — making it possible to bring a kayak to places you wouldn’t otherwise be able to.

The company is offering two different versions of the kayak: the Coast, and the slightly more tricked-out Coast+. The plus is three pounds heavier than the basic model, but it boasts a small dry hatch, an integrated rear hatch, full deck rigging, and an adjustable footrest. Both are available for preorder on Kickstarter, and can be had for $1,775 and $2,100, respectively.

Somewhat unsurprisingly, the project has already annihilated its $40K funding goal, and is currently sitting pretty at around $140K. Barring any major hiccups in the manufacturing process, Oru expects to begin shipping to backers as early as September.

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