Are sideline brain scanners about to become a reality?

CT-Scans-headerCT scanners are undoubtedly great, but they’re huge, pricey, and require specialists in special rooms to operate.

Enter researchers at UC Berkeley, who are developing a highly portable, (relatively) inexpensive equally non-invasive device that in early testing has shown capable of matching a CT’s diagnostic abilities. Officially referred to as “Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase Shift,” or VEPS, the halo-like device “can detect changes in tissue properties inside the body through non-contact, multi-frequency electromagnetic measurements from the exterior of the body.”

Essentially, using wireless technology, low energy electromagnetic waves are sent through the brain, measuring changes in conductivity to differentiate between excess fluids (edema) or blood buildup (hematoma) and normal brain tissue. Moreover, Boris Rubinsky, Professor of the Graduate School at UC Berkeley’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and a leader of the research team, says the device can detect changes in the brain (concussion, for example) from the start of an event – say a football game, just for fun – and the end.

For pros and collegiate athletes, it could change the way players are monitored, speeding diagnosis and preventing the sort of mistakes like the one made with then-Cleveland quarterback Colt McCoy, who re-entered a game despite suffering serious concussion after a hit by Steelers linebacker James Harrison. (Rubinsky says the research team has contacted the joint venture between GE and the NFL on head injury diagnosis and prevention.)

At the high school level, not only could the device aid in faster diagnosis, but fill serious gaps in the availability of diagnostic tools, generally, whether created by economics or geography. CT imaging scans that might be readily available at a hospital only blocks away for football players in Chicago could take hours to reach for athletes in rural Nebraska.

Computing

Cloudflare’s privacy-enhancing 1.1.1.1 DNS service comes to iOS and Android

Cloudflare's 1.1.1.1 DNS resolver service has been ported to mobile devices, and now anyone with an Android or iOS device can download it for free to take advantage of its speed and privacy-boosting features.
Gaming

PlayStation Classic powered by open-source emulator made by fans

The PlayStation Classic will be powered by the open-source, fan-made PCSX ReARMed emulator. The move is an unexpected one for Sony, particularly because it has not entirely been friendly with the emulation community.
Gaming

These cheat codes made gaming history

For almost as long as video games have existed, there have been video game cheat codes. Here are some of the most famous cheat codes, including the legendary Konami Code found in dozens of games.
Emerging Tech

Curiosity rover active and drilling again after computer issue

The Curiosity rover has succeeded in drilling a hole into the tough bedrock that previously defeated it, allowing imaging and collection of samples. The rover had been incapacitated for a few weeks due to problems with its computer.
Emerging Tech

Breakthrough in paralysis treatment restores walking ability in record time

Three paraplegics who sustained serious spinal injuries years earlier have regained the ability to walk again, courtesy of electrical stimulation of their spinal cords using a wireless implant.
Deals

Walmart kicks off Black Friday with a home gym discount

As the holidays inch nearer and nearer, some of the biggest retailers are unveiling their best Black Friday offers. If your objective is to start living a healthier life, Walmart has the best deal right now on a home gym.
Wearables

Fitbit's latest update brings 'Quick Replies' feature to the Charge 3

Back in August, Fitbit confirmed its new wearable -- the Fitbit Charge 3. The new fitness tracker features a touchscreen OLED display, smartwatch capabilities, enhanced fitness features and more. Here's everything you need to know about it.
Outdoors

Built to take a beating and still perform, these are the best hiking watches

A proper hiking watch should track exercise metrics and act as a navigational co-pilot during any kind of hike. Ideally, it'll even have a built-in GPS system and sensors. Here are five of the best hiking watches.
Wearables

Fitbit Charge 3 vs. Fitbit Versa: Which one should you choose?

Fitbit's latest fitness tracker -- the Charge 3 -- comes with smartwatch capabilities similar to the Fitbit Versa. With only a $50 difference between them, we pit the two wearables against each other to find out which one is worth the…
Outdoors

These bike lights use the magic of magnetism to generate power

Magnetic Microlights are a new option for cyclists that use nothing more than magnets to generate power to illuminate a bike light that is bright, eco-friendly, and increases the safety of riders.
Smart Home

Row your way to a healthy bod with the CityRow Go connected rowing machine

Want the connected experience of a Peloton but dislike biking? You can now feel the burn of a cardio-busting rowing session from the comfort of your living room with the new CityRow Go connected home rowing machine.
Mobile

Here's a look at what's inside Fossil's Pop-up Shop in New York

Fossil has released its first-ever smartwatch featuring Qualcomm's Snapdragon Wear 3100. The Fossil Sport comes packed with a heart rate monitor, built-in GPS, NFC, and Google's latest version of Wear OS. Here's everything you need to know.
Deals

Cyber Monday 2018: When it takes place and where to find the best deals

Cyber Monday is still a ways off, but it's never too early to start planning ahead. With so many different deals to choose from during one of the biggest shopping holidays of the year, going in with a little know-how makes all the…
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: 1-handed drone control, a pot that stirs itself

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!