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Facebook widens reach with app for feature phones

Facebook for feature phoneFacebook is well aware of its presence in the mobile market, but until now it’s been limited to smartphones users. Now, the social network has announced it will be expanding its reach to “the most popular mobile phones around the world.” In other words, feature phones. The app has an easy-to-navigate UI that gives the smartphone-less sector complete mobile access to Facebook.

Feature phones are a step down from Android and iOS devices, and are the communication tool of choice in developing countries around the world. Cell phone owners easily outnumber Internet users, and Facebook’s keeping this in mind as it expands its global reach. A Neilsen survey from this summer found that most of the world’s mobile phone users own feature phones, especially in countries like China and India.

According to the company’s blog, Facebook worked with mobile Internet expert Snaptu to introduce the Facebook for Feature Phones app, which will operate on more than 2,500 Nokia, Sony Ericcson, LG, and other devices. Various international mobile carriers have also gotten on board by nixing data charges for the first 90 days of use. Starting today, feature phone users in Sri Lanka, Poland, Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia are just some of the consumers able to access mobile Facebook.

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Molly McHugh
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Before coming to Digital Trends, Molly worked as a freelance writer, occasional photographer, and general technical lackey…
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