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Yamaha brings Power Assist ebikes to the U.S. for the first time

Road cyclists, mountain bikers, and bike commuters looking to purchase their first ebike now have some new options to consider courtesy of Yamaha. The company’s Power Assist line of ebikes have begun making their way into specialty bike shops across the U.S., marking the very first time that the Japanese company’s electric bicycles have made their way into the American market.

The Power Assist line consists of four different ebikes, including a drop-bar road bike called the UrbanRush ($3,299), a commuter version dubbed the CrossConnect ($2,999), and the fitness/utility model called the CrossCore ($2,399). The YDX-Torc ($3,499) rounds out the lineup, offering mountain bikers a full-featured off-road edition complete with front suspension, hydraulic disc brakes, and an integrated rear hub speed sensor.

Yamaha was one of the first companies to actually experiment with putting electric drives on bicycles way back in the late 1980s and early 1990s. That long history of creating drive systems for ebikes has resulted in a new generation of 250-watt high-torque, mid-drive motors that are powered by 500-watt-hour lithium ion batteries. This gives road riders four levels of pedal assist (Eco+, Eco, Standard, and High) that allow them to ride at speeds of up to 20 miles per hour. The off-road YDX-Toc comes equipped with a slightly modified motor known as the PW-X, which has a fifth mode that provides even more power.

2018 Yamaha Power Assist Bicycles

One of the biggest challenges that Yamaha has faced in getting its line of Power Assist bikes into the American market is working with bike shops that aren’t necessarily familiar with the brand. While the company has sold hundreds of thousands of bikes in Japan and elsewhere, it isn’t a known quantity amongst cyclists in the United States just yet. But since the bikes were officially announced this past spring, Yamaha has been working closely with bike dealers to build an extensive network of retailers that can offer both online and brick-and-mortar options for customers. There is even a store locator on the company’s website for those looking to take a Power Assist bike for a test drive.

All four Power Assist models come in three sizes – small, medium, and large – and are available now. Find out more on the Yamaha Power Assist ebikes website.

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Kraig Becker
Kraig Becker is a freelance outdoor writer who loves to hike, camp, mountain bike, trail run, paddle, or just about any other…
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