Creative Sound Blaster Tactic 3D Sigma Review

The Creative Sound blaster Tactic 3D Sigma’s have a lot of good things going for them.
The Creative Sound blaster Tactic 3D Sigma’s have a lot of good things going for them.
The Creative Sound blaster Tactic 3D Sigma’s have a lot of good things going for them.

Highs

  • Comfortable to wear
  • 3D directional audio works well
  • Very customizable

Lows

  • Construction is a little flimsy
  • Muddy, flat bass
  • Software is not included, has to be downloaded

If you are a hardcore gamer, then wearing a headset is nothing new – you’ve probably had one for years. For those just now getting into the gaming scene, hold onto your pants because there are literally 80 or 90 headsets to choose from, coming from several different manufacturers. Creative alone has ten different gaming headsets, all at various price points and each one touting a whole slew of features. The Creative Sound Blaster Tactic 3D Sigma (a ridiculously long title) feature what Creative calls “high-resolution Dual-Mode 3D surround” and are available now at the street price of $54.99 – 69.99. Now, since there are ten different Creative gaming headsets alone to choose from, we will attempt to tell you how the Sigma stands out from the rest of the line-up.

Features and Design

Out of the ten different headsets to choose from under the Creative brand, there are two which are very similar in features, the Creative Sound blaster Tactic 3D Sigma and the more affordable Alphas. Both headsets feature Dual-Mode analog and USB connections, THX TruStudio Pro technology, touchscreen controls, customizable audio settings, and various gaming FX voices. $30 more for the Sigma, and you get 50mm “high-resolution” neodymium drivers and a steel core headband which Creative claims will give the headset more durability and a longer lifespan. The Alphas do come with a 40mm Neodymium driver which is still very good, and would most likely would also be considered “high-resolution” by the same set of rules. Having a larger driver doesn’t simply make it more “high-resolution” or not. If you are thinking that this is nothing but marketing fluff, then you are probably on the right track.

Creative Sound blaster Tactic 3D SigmaThere are two connection types to choose from with the Sigma. The Dual-Mode analog or USB plug is nice because you can either use a USB port on the system, or the old-fashioned pink microphone and green analog mini-jacks, thus assuring compatibility with older systems.

THX TruStudio Pro technology supposedly allows you to hear directional audio while wearing the Sigma’s; footsteps can be heard behind you, gunfire in front of you, and your comrades to the side for example.

Creative Sound blaster Tactic 3D Sigma

If you have a Windows 7 based system, then you can use the TacticalControl driver which allows you to create custom equalizer settings and VoiceFX controls. You can also use the very same settings that world-famous gamers like Fatal1ty and complexity use while gaming – a cool feature for those that like to emulate their favorite star. There is a code field in the software that will allow you to enter secret codes you can find on the web to unlock even more features like extra FX or color themes.

The Sigmas have an average build quality that borders on the flimsy side. At the $90-100 MSRP price-point, the Tritton AX 51PRO’s and the Turtle Beach Ear Force HPA2’s offer a better build and have a more serious feel to them. Creative uses a nice faux-leather for their ear pieces which feels nice and helps to block out most of the outside noise. And fortunately for Creative, the shape of the ear pieces work to their advantage. Both the Trittons and the Turtle Beach headphones have larger ear cups with the Trittons being squarer than round, but the Sigmas just feel better, especially after prolonged use.

Creative Sound blaster Tactic 3D Sigma

The Sigma features an in-line remote control which you can use to adjust the volume level or mute it all together. The remote is lightweight and simple to use, and attaches to a nice flat cord which we had no tangling issues with whatsoever. The cord is nice and long at over 6 1/2 feet, and should work out for most users.

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