Lomography to satiate impatient analog film lovers with new instant camera

lomography satiate impatient analog film lovers new instant camera lomoinstant group shot
Lomography's new Lomo'Instant camera, in (from left to right) Sanremo (leather), black, white, and Kickstarter Special Edition (mint green and orange).

Instant film isn’t exactly new for Lomography, the purveyor of analog photography. Alongside its various film-based cameras are the Instax instant film models from Fujifilm. But the company has announced the Lomo’Instant, its own instant camera system that’s dubbed “the world’s most creative.” Like its recent Petzval creation, Lomo is hitting up the Kickstarter community to help fund the project. 

So, why instant film? Unlike the hundreds of photos people take with their smartphones, Lomo says an instant photo is a “real object” that you can physically share or hang on a wall. (It also forces you to be more creative and selective about what you shoot, because instant film is really expensive.)

The types of photos you can shoot with the Lomo'Instant (click to enlarge).
The types of photos you can shoot with the Lomo’Instant (click to enlarge).

To put it in Lomo’s words: “We set out to design the ultimate instant camera. A camera that combines our passion for instant analogue photography with our technical experience. A camera that is accessible for everyone, from long time instant photography lovers to first time Lomo’Instant owners. Most importantly, we wanted to create a fun camera packed with awesome features and endless opportunities to experiment!”

The camera has built-in wide-angle, 27mm-equivalent lens with a 1.3-foot focusing distance for up-close shots, but it also accommodates optional fisheye (170-degree view) and portrait lens (35mm equivalent) attachments. There are three shooting modes (flash-on auto, flash-on manual, and flash-off manual); with the manual modes, you can create unlimited multiple exposures in one shot or take one long-exposure shot during nighttime (capture traffic taillight and headlight streaks, or light paintings). You can cover the flash with color gels that add a unique filter over your shots (kids, this is the old-school way of doing it). There is a tripod mount and cable release mount (for remote shutter).

The Lomo’Instant has a shutter speed of 1/125 of a second. Lomo claims the Lomo’Instant has the largest aperture setting in the instant photography world, with a max of f/8 for bright shots, or f/22 when you want more detail (the camera goes up to f/32, but it gets pretty dark with that small aperture; see the animated GIFs for examples). The camera uses Fujifilm Instax Mini credit-card-sized film, so film should relatively be easy to find. The whole thing is powered by four AAA batteries.

Lomo is offering the camera in four designs: white, black, Sanremo, and a Kickstarter Special Edition. Lomo plans to sell the cameras between $120 and $150 at retail, but early adopters can get one by pledging $89 for either a black or white version (an early bird special of $89 will get you the lens accessories; the other color options cost a little more). Regardless, you’ll get a discount if you get one via Kickstarter; expected delivery is November 2014. The campaign ends on June 27, with a goal of $100,000.

Even though it uses Fujifilm’s Instax film, the camera is unproven since it’s brand new. According to Lomo, the mechanical design is the crucial step. “Stabilizing the film ejection roller system and automatic flash output control is a particularly delicate challenge for us. We are also taking particular care in implementing the shooting modes and ensuring that all features can be reproduced on a mass scale.” This isn’t the first time Lomography has dabbled with instant film: it recently unveiled an instant film attachment for its Belair medium-format camera, although that one uses a hand-crank instead of a motor. There are a lot of Instax and instant film fans out there, so the Lomo’Instant should garner plenty of interest.

(Images via Lomography)

Photography

Family feud: Huawei P30 Pro vs. P20 Pro vs. Mate 20 Pro camera shootout

The Huawei P30 Pro's camera has an amazing zoom mode and low light capabilities. But take these away, and how does it compare when facing its sibling phones, the P20 Pro and Mate 20 Pro, taking regular photos?
Photography

Panasonic Lumix S1R vs. Nikon Z 7: When megapixels matter, which do you choose?

The 47-megapixels Lumix S1R and 46-megapixel Nikon Z 7 are the two highest-resolution, full-frame mirrorless cameras on the market. The S1R features a high-resolution mode that can take 187MP images, but the Nikon is lighter and cheaper.
Mobile

Breaking news: Samsung responds to reported Galaxy Fold display issues

The Samsung Galaxy Fold has arrived, and it goes on sale soon. Folding out from a 4.6-inch display to a tablet-sized 7.3-inch display, this unique device has six cameras, two batteries, and special software to help you use multiple apps.
Deals

The Canon EOS Rebel T6 DSLR camera gets a steep price cut at Walmart

Modern smartphones can snap pretty impressive pics, but if you want pro-quality photos, you need a dedicated digital camera. The Canon EOS Rebel T6 is one of the best entry-level DSLR cameras on the market, and it’s on sale right now for…
Photography

Go for bokeh, not for broke with the best cameras under $1,000

Looking for a great camera without spending more than $1,000? From the stellar Fujifilm X-T30 to the beginner-friendly Canon EOS Rebel T7i, here are the best sub-$1,000 cameras on the market right now.
Photography

These are the best camera straps you can get your hands on

Choosing the right camera strap for your needs can be a tough decision. To help sort through the junk, we've rounded up the best camera straps on the market for you to choose from.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Halfbikes, VR for all your senses, and more

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it's fun to gawk!
Photography

Fujifilm X-T30 vs. Sony A6400: Midrange mirrorless cameras compared

The Fujifilm X-T30 and Sony A6400 are two of the best cameras you can buy for under $1,000, but which should you choose? Each has an edge in certain situations which makes picking a winner difficult, but here's how they compare.
Photography

Photography news: Sony brings Eye Autofocus to critters via A.I.

In this week's photography news, the Sony a7 III and a7R III have some new capabilities, thanks to updated firmware. Lexar teases a crazy fast 1,000MB/s memory card, while Vimeo launches bulk upload possibilities.
Product Review

Equal parts tool and toy, the Lensbaby Edge 35 bucks photographic tradition

The Lensbaby Edge 35, part of the Composer Pro optic swap system, creates tilt-shift-like blur without the tilt-shift price. Made for photographers who want find tradition boring, it opens up new ways to work with blur.
Deals

The best budget-friendly GoPro alternatives that won’t leave you broke

Cold weather is here, and a good action camera is the perfect way to record all your adventures. You don't need to shell out the big bucks for a GoPro: Check out these great GoPro alternatives, including some 4K cameras, that won’t leave…
Photography

Etch-A-Snap camera puts a modern spin on one of your favorite childhood toys

Can't draw on an Etch A Sketch? Snap a photo with the Etch-A-Snap and the camera will draw out the scene for you. The weirdly cool camera designed by Martin Fitzpatrick replaces the usual LCD screen with an old-school Etch A Sketch.
Photography

The Black Eye Pro Cinema Wide G4 is a knockout lens for any smartphone

Where cheaper wide-angle accessory lenses add distortion, and costlier models don't always justify their higher prices, the Black Eye Pro Cinema Wide G4 offers a valuable balance of modest price and high quality optics.
Photography

Nikon Z 7 vs. Sony A7R III: High-res mirrorless cameras compared

The Nikon Z 7 and Sony A7R III both have over 40 megapixels, but which one comes out on top? With similar image quality, the answer comes down to speed, autofocus, battery life, and design.