The Sony HXC-FB80 is your entry point into scaleable 4K broadcasts

Sony HXC-FB80

Accessing 4K, HDR-ready video inside of studio and broadcast applications is getting a bit more affordable with the launch of the Sony HXC-FB80 camera and HXCU-FB80 camera control unit. The broadcast camera system, Sony says, offers a “future-proof” 4K solution at an accessible entry point.

The Sony HXC-FB80 uses three 2/3-inch CMOS sensors with quality to support 60 frames per second at 1,080 x 1,920, while the camera control unit works to upscale the content to 4K (3,840 x 2,160), with a 12G-SDI output and a 3G-SDI quad-link. Sony says the camera is ideal for low-light shooting because of the signal-to-noise ratio that hits -60dB and the high sensitivity rating of F13 at 50Hz or F12 at 59.95Hz.

HDR support won’t quite be ready with at the January 2018 launch but will come later that summer in the form of a free firmware update.

A built-in neutral density filter can also be controlled remotely. A new filter servo motor sits inside the camera head and also supports an electronic color correction filter.

The camera head and the camera control unit don’t necessarily have to be mounted together — Sony says the two can be linked with cables up to about 1,970 feet, with extension cables expanding that to over 3,000 feet.

Along with using the camera control unit to control the system, an RCP remote mode allows the system to be controlled remotely with the right accessories. Multi-camera set-ups are also possible, factoring into the scaleability and “future proof” idea.

The HXC-FB80 has several features in common with the older HXC-FB75, including selling in the same configurations with just the camera body, with a lens, portable viewfinder, and microphone or with a lens and large viewfinder.

“Since its debut, the HXC series has been adopted worldwide for diverse uses,” Sony’s statement reads. “This new camera system is based on customer input and the added support for up-scaled 4K and HD-HDR production expands the system to a wider range of applications.”

The new camera system will be on display at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in New York on October 18 and 19. NAB events often bring new broadcast gear, like Sony’s announcements at the Las Vegas event earlier this year.